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Thread: Fractional Dimes

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by silverheartbone View Post
    Interesting, over $2 per gram.
    In what sizes?
    You name it! Dimes, Quarters, Halves. THIS IS WHY. lots of people can't afford to spend $40+ on silver. So they buy fractional because they can afford it. It's not die hard silver collectors like us buying this. It's people just starting out their stacks... teens, young adults, whoever doesn't want to invest a ton of money but are willing to spend $20 for a shiny precious metal.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SilverCoin View Post
    You name it! Dimes, Quarters, Halves. THIS IS WHY. lots of people can't afford to spend $40+ on silver. So they buy fractional because they can afford it. It's not die hard silver collectors like us buying this. It's people just starting out their stacks... teens, young adults, whoever doesn't want to invest a ton of money but are willing to spend $20 for a shiny precious metal.
    You had my hopes up for some smaller items.
    You may be undercharging. (see post 3 in this thread) j/k

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by silverheartbone View Post
    You had my hopes up for some smaller items.
    You may be undercharging. (see post 3 in this thread) j/k
    lol. It's unbelievable what people will pay. Although GRAMS is recognizable right now with Gold, I don't believe grams in Silver has yet to really be prevalent. Once silver prices get into the hundreds we will see a lot more GRAM silver for sure in the market. If you were to buy from Apmex I would recommend paying by check because the Credit Card prices are ridiculous on almost everything on that site & shipping is usually $20-$25 whenever I buy.

  4. #14
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    Exactly what is a "fractional dime"???

    A penny?

    Don't ever remember seeing a 1/10th dime.
    But then again, I guess those would be exceptionally SMALL.
    Caedite eos.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by maplesilverbug View Post
    Exactly what is a "fractional dime"???

    A penny?

    Don't ever remember seeing a 1/10th dime.
    But then again, I guess those would be exceptionally SMALL.
    If a dime is 2.2 grams, then any silver minted in a smaller size would qualify.



    Why didn't you know that?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by maplesilverbug View Post
    Exactly what is a "fractional dime"???

    A penny?

    Don't ever remember seeing a 1/10th dime.
    But then again, I guess those would be exceptionally SMALL.
    1/10 of an oz. Which is the size of a DIME in the fractional world. 1/4 of an oz. round is the size of a quarter. They are generic rounds that are just DIME & QUARTER size but its all fractional silver.

  7. #17
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    Default Our (the republic's) earliest manifestation was the 1782 half disme.

    Quote Originally Posted by SilverCoin View Post
    1/10 of an oz. Which is the size of a DIME in the fractional world. 1/4 of an oz. round is the size of a quarter. They are generic rounds that are just DIME & QUARTER size but its all fractional silver.
    There is a big difference between 3.1 and 2.2 grams.
    This may cause problems downstream.

    1792 Half Disme
    The 1792 half disme (or "half dime") was an American silver coin with a face value of five cents. Although it is subject to debate as to whether this was intended to be circulating coinage or instead an experimental issue, President George Washington referred to it as "a small beginning" and many of the coins eventually were released into circulation. It is widely (although not universally) considered the first United States coinage struck under authority of the Mint Act of April 1792.


    Flowing Hair 1794-1795

    The flowing hair half dime was designed by Robert Scot and this same design
    was also used for half dollar and dollar silver coins minted during the same period. The obverse bears a Liberty portrait similar to that appearing on the 1794 half cent and cent but without the liberty cap and pole. Mintage of the 1794 version was 7,765 while 78,660 of the 1795 version were produced.[3]

    Draped Bust (Small Eagle Reverse) 1796-1797

    The obverse of the draped bust half dime was based on a sketch by artist Gilbert Stuart, with the dies engraved by Robert Scot and John Eckstein. The primary 1796 variety bears fifteen stars representing the then number of states in the union. In 1797, fifteen and sixteen star varieties were produced - the sixteenth star representing newly admitted Tennessee - as well as a thirteen star variety after the mint realized that it could not continue to add more stars as additional states joined the union. The reverse bears an open wreath surrounding a small eagle perched on a cloud. 54,757 half dimes of this design were minted.[4]

    Draped Bust (Heraldic Eagle Reverse) 1800-1805

    Following a two year hiatus, mintage of half dimes resumed in 1800. The obverse remained essentially the same as the prior version, but the reverse was revised substantially. The eagle on the reverse now had outstretched wings, heraldic style. This reverse design first appeared on gold quarter and half eagles and then dimes and dollars in the 1790s. Mintage of the series never surpassed 40,000, with none produced in 1804. No denomination or mintmark appears on the coins; all were minted in Philadelphia.[5]

    Capped Bust 1829-1837

    Production of half dimes resumed in 1829 based on a new design by Chief Engraver William Kneass, who is believed to have adapted an earlier John Reich design. All coins were minted at Philadelphia and display no mintmark. The high circulating mintage in the series was in 1835, when 2,760,000 were struck, and the low of 871,000 was in 1837. Both Capped Bust and Liberty Seated half dimes were minted in 1837.[6] [7]

    Seated Liberty (various subtypes) 1837-1873

    These were the last silver half dimes produced. The design features Liberty seated on a rock and holding a shield and was first conceived in 1835 used first on the silver dollar patterns of 1836. The series is divided into several subtypes. The first was struck at Philadelphia in 1837 and New Orleans in 1838 and lacks stars on the obverse. In 1838 a semicircle of 13 stars was added around the obverse border, and this basic design was used through 1859. In 1853, small arrows were added to each side of the date to reflect a reduction in weight due to rising silver prices, and the arrows remained in place through 1855. The arrows were dropped in 1856, with the earlier design resumed through 1859. In 1860, the obverse stars were replaced with the inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and the reverse wreath was enlarged. This design stayed in place through the end of the series. In 1978 a unique 1870-S Seated Liberty half dime became known. The Seated Liberty half dime was produced at the Philadelphia, San Francisco and New Orleans mints in an aggregate amount of 84,828,478 coins struck for circulation. [8] [9] [10] See also United States Seated Liberty coinage.

    1870-S half dime

    In 1978 a coin collector surprised the coin collecting community with an 1870-S (San Francisco) half dime, believed to have been found in a dealer's box of cheap coins at a coin show. According to mint records for 1870, no half dimes had been minted in San Francisco; yet it was a genuine 1870-S half dime. At an auction later that same year, the 1870-S half dime sold for $425,000. It is believed that another example may exist—along with other denominations minted that year in San Francisco—in the cornerstone of the old San Francisco Mint.

    Canada (notice no duh slur ending?)

    Canada also once used silver coins of five-cent denomination; they were colloquially referred to as "fish scales" because they were very thin (the term "half dime" never having been used in Canada), and were produced until Canada also switched to nickel five-cent pieces in 1922.

    -----------------------

    I have yet to determine the silver content, maybe it's in one of my red books, I'll check later.

    But I'm thinking that those one gram bars pictured above are very, very close to a nickel's worth of silver.
    If they were round, then I'm sure that some would call them silver nickels.
    "I foresee little future in 'the price of silver', I see a huge future for 'the price in silver'." - heartbone
    "The truth is called hate by those who hate the truth." - K

  8. #18
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    Impressive & very interesting. Did you write that? lol Well if it is considered a ''Silver Nickel'' they would probably fetch somewhere around $2-2.25...at least that's what war nickels usually fetch. Good thing we don't have to worry about that yet, I think the 'ounce' is much more recognizable. There is a grey area when it comes to grams if your talking such small amounts.

  9. #19
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    I'm a big 90% dime collector, my theory is, if the S does HTF dimes will be a lot easier to barter with than 1, 10, 100 oz. bullion. That's if Oblamer doesn't pull an FDR on us and confiscate our PM's.
    Have any of you pondered that? what if these high prices are just a set up for something like that? I mean if Oblamer decides to do something like that, the silver we are buying at $35.00 to $40.00 an ounce and GOLD at almost $1700.00 an ounce! If Oblamer decides to confiscate, he could say that he only going to pay??? An d we could lose big time! Especially with the Feds printing money into oblivion!!!
    And the words of the LORD are flawless, like silver refined in a furnace of clay, purified seven times.
    Psalm 12:6

  10. #20
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    As opposed to the stories, FDR didn't confiscate metals.

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