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Does anyone clean their Pre 1965 Silver Coins? - Page 3
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Thread: Does anyone clean their Pre 1965 Silver Coins?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    403

    Default

    Have to disagree with cleaning circulated coins. All it does is make them look real "faunky", and now & down the road may well reduce their liquidity because some folks will think they may be counterfiet...because they don't look "right".

    There isn't one good reason to clean circulated coins.

    Don't do it. "And that's all I have to say about that."

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    3

    Default

    We use Goddards Silver Dip, it removes tarnish without damaging the surface of the silver.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    737

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goldminer View Post
    have to disagree with cleaning circulated coins. All it does is make them look real "faunky", and now & down the road may well reduce their liquidity because some folks will think they may be counterfiet...because they don't look "right".

    There isn't one good reason to clean circulated coins.

    Don't do it. "and that's all i have to say about that."
    and that is all that needs to be said.
    Gb

    LUCK favors the PREPARED darling. - "Edna Mole"

    ATTENTION Liberals and Progressives - The path to HELL is paved with good intentions.
    ( The USA is certainly spiraling in that direction)

    "The future ain't what it used to be". - Yogi Berra

    .

  4. #24
    akak Guest

    Default

    I will admit to having used TARNEX on some circulated, purely bullion-value silver coins, but even this non-abrasive cleaner will leave evidence of its use on any coin, and would be immediately detected by a professional. For bullion-value only coins, it is OK, but never, NEVER try to use it on a numismatic coin! You WILL damage it, no matter how careful you think you are, or how pretty you thinks it looks afterward!

    I have attended seminars for professionals at major numismatic conventions on the topic of coin cleaning and restoration, and I was utterly blown away by the meticulous, astonishing skill and education necessary for professionals in this field. Those seminars, by the way, were NOT about how to do it yourself at home, but just the opposite --- they were held to demonstrate the IMPOSSIBILITY of doing it yourself properly at home! Professionally cleaning coins is as much an art as a skill, and is NOT something that any amateur can do successfully, no more than any average person could properly dissect a mummy or perform an appendectomy successfully either.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    403

    Default

    My final 2-cents re cleaning junk silver coins is easy. Don't do it.

    Circulated coins are expected to have a certain VERY notable patina, often a distuinguishing odor, and show wear.

    Coins that show wear look faunky and phoney (fake?) to an uneducated/inexperienced eye. Minimally this makes the coins generally less desirable = in some cases < liquidity, which may well hurt the seller down the road at trade-out.

    Conversely, there isn't a viable reason to clean circulated junk coins which means it's a virtual waste of time and effort. So again if a person is smart IMO, they don't do it.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Well, last week I bought a 1880 Morgan silver dollar that was in the junk bowl at the coin shop. The coin was in nice shape except for a couple of dents on the rim. So the dealer marked it as junk. The markings on it are still fairly well defined but the coin was dirty. I checked on the internet about cleaning old silver and was told to use ammonia, rinse with water, then pat dry with paper towels. So I did that and the junk coin now looks really nice. I'm happy with it. I bought it for it's silver content anyway, but now have a nice looking piece.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Fly-over country, South Dakota. The heart of the USA
    Posts
    1,404

    Default

    OK, this I just don't get:
    You bought an old junk 1880 Morgan dollar that looked like an old silver coin and you turned it into a shiny NEW-looking piece of bull/ion?
    Why, oh why?
    JesterJay
    If you don't GOT it, You don't GET it!

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,654

    Default

    Dimes and Quarters, no. Morgans and Peaces I use Palmolive dish soap and a toothbrush.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    737

    Default

    Some people just REFUSE to take "NO" ( don't bother) as and answer.
    Gb

    LUCK favors the PREPARED darling. - "Edna Mole"

    ATTENTION Liberals and Progressives - The path to HELL is paved with good intentions.
    ( The USA is certainly spiraling in that direction)

    "The future ain't what it used to be". - Yogi Berra

    .

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Zionot, Squashkenazi
    Posts
    11,586

    Default Guilty as charged.

    I own it, I do what I want to with it.
    A baking soda & water paste works well.

    I've found "Mercury" dimes that are highly polished in bought junk.
    They look really cool and I always separate those out.

    For junk it really does not matter,
    as they will certainly get melted during the frenzy.
    "I foresee little future in 'the price of silver', I see a huge future for 'the price in silver'." - heartbone
    "The truth is called hate by those who hate the truth." - K

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