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TSHTF food
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Thread: TSHTF food

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  1. #1
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    Default TSHTF food

    Quote Originally Posted by silverheartbone View Post
    Because of the GSM induced climate change and the increased surface UV-C,
    I doubt that I will be able to rely on outdoor gardening to produce like it has in the past.


    Future holiday meals? April 2018 price (April 2023 prices)
    https://smile.amazon.com/Wise-Compan...dp/B006RLOKW0/ $113.50 (1.135 grams)
    https://smile.amazon.com/Mountain-Ho...dp/B00955DUHQ/ $77.38
    https://smile.amazon.com/Mountain-Ho...dp/B00955337I/ $69.81
    https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B000M7V186/ $27.89
    https://smile.amazon.com/Mountain-Ho...dp/B000M8071M/ $29.65 (0.2965 grams)
    https://smile.amazon.com/Mountain-Ho...dp/B00RJM2GX6/ $9.49
    https://smile.amazon.com/Mountain-Ho...dp/B000SJNI6G/ $10.49
    https://smile.amazon.com/Backpackers...dp/B01N4SK0ZN/ $7.50
    https://smile.amazon.com/Backpackers...dp/B001GUP3UA/ $5.50 (0.055 grams)
    Quote Originally Posted by valerb View Post
    I doubt you have actually bought any of those items you've listed above and actually tried eating it, especially with the cost per serving.

    I don't stock anything I haven't tried eating first and I never found anything packaged for long term that was a meal that didn't suck or wasn't a waste of money.

    Not that freeze dried meals are not a whole lot better than dehydrated foods, but the cost per meal is not worth the investment for long term storage.

    However there are a few items that can be bought that you wouldn't notice any difference and those are basically your raw materials so to speak.

    Butter, real butter can be bought in cans, it's not cheap but you can find it on sale for long term storage.
    artificial milk is not bad at all, but powered milk still sucks today as it did decades ago.
    artificial meat might be ok for your pets and they "might" not complain.

    Baking goods are very good but don't have the longest storage life.
    things like rice, flour, oat meal and noodles will store for years so no need to go crazy with buying whole wheat to grind yourself and not be able to stand eating it.
    besides you can buy these basic items yourself and package them for long term storage if your going to do a lot of it to justify the expense of the material needed.

    You can buy these items pre-packaged from a number of sources and the Mormon church is a great source if they have a canning center near you.
    buying bulk meals that are prepackaged is the most expensive way to prepare for a disaster and they tie you into those items only.

    Buy and store things you eat today or the products that are needed to created the things you eat today and you'll be happy tomorrow.

    Store a couple years worth of canned goods that you use on a regular basis so they will be good when something bad happens and just keep rotating them, it's much cheaper than buying dehydrated or freeze dried products that can cost many times the price of your canned goods for a single serving.

    canned eggs are not to bad and scrambled egg mix are better in my opinion, but not as good as the real thing, but you either store canned eggs or do without in a disaster and that can be hard to do in the long run.

    To me, real meat is the most important as it makes up almost any meal. Freeze dried is very expensive and you have to be careful about the canned variety because of the cheap quality as noted in their fat content. It last many many years and it's already cooked. Beef, ground beef, chicken pork and Turkey are the basics. I personally stock some beef and some pork and the bulk of my meat is ground beef because it goes with just about anything you want to make. I carry the Keystone variety because it's only 6% fat in their beef and when you open the can, you can pull off more of that 6% as it's congealed as long as the can is not too warm. I bought it for a lot less, but their current price is $4.04 per pound in the 14.5 ounce cans and $3.57 per pound in their 28 ounce cans. They only sell it by the case unless you happen to live by their store in Lima Ohio and can pick it up which is what I always did to save a bundle on shipping. How much they sell their products for in stores I have no idea but they do sell it in many chain stores in the north.

    We have a lot of canned cheese but it's all one flavor so when Honeyville was running a super deal on freeze dried cheese several years ago, I bought several cans of different types for variety, but that's the extent of my willingness to pay for freeze dried anything that I stock.

    Other than meat, dairy and baked goods, I've added the rest myself either by long term storing them myself or just simply putting them on the shelf.

    I wasted a lot of money sampling different things only to find out I would never want to try and live off the crap they advertise as very tasty, so I only stock the things that we liked that actually taste good and that's not very much that comes pre-made in a can other than pre-mixed baked goods. Kind of like buying Silver only to find out it's only Silver coated when it's time to sell.

    Most of these Pre-made meals can be bought in sample packs as trial offers to see if you even like their products. Not the cheapest way, but a lot better than buying a whole can and finding out you only like some or none of the meals inside. If a vendor doesn't offer trial packs, that should be a warning. Mixed cans is not good either unless you already know you like all the different types inside each can as these meals are not cheap to begin with. I wouldn't buy from places like Ebay and maybe not even Amazon as too many people dumping problem cans that are suspect with dents or are several years old and maybe halfway through their expected life cycle. Regular dealers like Honeyville or Augason Farms will help with problem when they come up when your dealing with them directly. Well Augason Farms use to before they were sold, so I have no knowledge what they are like today. The point is, only buy after you have already tried anything out for long term storage and think about would you really be willing to eat this product on a regular basis if you had to or anything for that matter. Variety is the spice of long term survival.

    Unless your really looking to store for a long term disaster, why would you even consider long term storage food to begin with.

    There is nothing you can't buy off the shelf that won't fill your needs for just about any short term needs for either staying put or hitting the road.


    Quote Originally Posted by valerb View Post
    I doubt you have actually bought any of those items you've listed above and actually tried eating it, especially with the cost per serving.
    I actually have 3 of these much praised chicken breast and potato meal pouches arriving next week.
    https://smile.amazon.com/Mountain-Ho...dp/B000SJNI6G/

    I also have one of these buckets sitting unopened in my basement for the past 6 years.


    Butter, real butter can be bought in cans, it's not cheap but you can find it on sale for long term storage.
    https://www.amazon.com/Augason-Farms...dp/B00FTETVO8/ $16.86
    https://www.amazon.com/Augason-Farms...dp/B0096I6XSU/ $22.43
    https://www.amazon.com/Augason-Farms...dp/B0096I5DJU/ $21.20 eggs

    The cheese, butter, and eggs I'll pass on, as I doubt if I'd be doing much actual cooking,
    but these are what I'd consider.

    My style would be more like heating cans and pouches.
    I will be using a solar oven to make stews, to bake a few biscuits, to heat cans.


    Store a couple years worth of canned goods that you use on a regular basis so they will be good when something bad happens and just keep rotating them, it's much cheaper than buying dehydrated or freeze dried products that can cost many times the price of your canned goods for a single serving.
    I have and use canned veggies with an expiration date of 2011, guaranteed free of Fukushima fallout.

    Unless your really looking to store for a long term disaster, why would you even consider long term storage food to begin with.

    There is nothing you can't buy off the shelf that won't fill your needs for just about any short term needs for either staying put or hitting the road.
    True today, but with the imminent credit crunch combined with the "Just in Time" distribution system,
    there is no guarantee about future food supply.

    I believe in being prepared.

    I posted my long term storage food wish list, to see if anyone had experiences with the items to share.

    With my butane stove and water, I can eat hot food for as long as I have freeze dried stored food.
    With my dirt, seeds, water, and plant food, I can grow beans, tubers, veggies, and fruits outdoors during the warm season.
    I can ferment veggies, and dehydrate for the cold seasons.

    I have acquired a new Daisy BB pistol to harvest tree rats for the occasional stews.
    I just need to get a hacksaw capable of sawing off a shotgun barrel.
    "I foresee little future in 'the price of silver', I see a huge future for 'the price in silver'." - heartbone
    "The truth is called hate by those who hate the truth." - K

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by silverheartbone View Post
    I actually have 3 of these much praised chicken breast and potato meal pouches arriving next week.
    https://smile.amazon.com/Mountain-Ho...dp/B000SJNI6G/

    I also have one of these buckets sitting unopened in my basement for the past 6 years.



    https://www.amazon.com/Augason-Farms...dp/B00FTETVO8/ $16.86
    https://www.amazon.com/Augason-Farms...dp/B0096I6XSU/ $22.43
    https://www.amazon.com/Augason-Farms...dp/B0096I5DJU/ $21.20 eggs

    The cheese, butter, and eggs I'll pass on, as I doubt if I'd be doing much actual cooking,
    but these are what I'd consider.

    My style would be more like heating cans and pouches.
    I will be using a solar oven to make stews, to bake a few biscuits, to heat cans.



    I have and use canned veggies with an expiration date of 2011, guaranteed free of Fukushima fallout.


    True today, but with the imminent credit crunch combined with the "Just in Time" distribution system,
    there is no guarantee about future food supply.

    I believe in being prepared.

    I posted my long term storage food wish list, to see if anyone had experiences with the items to share.

    With my butane stove and water, I can eat hot food for as long as I have freeze dried stored food.
    With my dirt, seeds, water, and plant food, I can grow beans, tubers, veggies, and fruits outdoors during the warm season.
    I can ferment veggies, and dehydrate for the cold seasons.

    I have acquired a new Daisy BB pistol to harvest tree rats for the occasional stews.
    I just need to get a hacksaw capable of sawing off a shotgun barrel.



    I forgot to add the canned potatoes are a must have and I don't know how I left them out as I have such a large volume of them in stock.

    We prefer the mashed version best as it's the easiest to make and doesn't require any soaking.

    We find the diced potatoes very useful for some things as are the sliced potatoes, but we do not carry much of the sliced.

    The shredded taste ok, but we never eat it so that was a waste of time.

    Canned potatoes are one of the cheapest items you can buy for long term storage and mashed is the best for emergency situations as it only requires hot water to make.

    You can buy all these items in one gallon, five gallon and six gallon buckets.

    Dehydrated onion is another item that is dirt cheap and last forever, along with chopped peppers.

    Salt cost nothing and you can just put it in a bucket to protect it from pests for long term storage. I bought 4 pound boxes from Sam's club.

    Sugar is also extremely cheap especially bought in 25 pound bags at Sam's club.

    You don't really need a bag inside a storage bucket for sugar, if it's food safe, but I always use a five gallon bag just to be sure.

    Leaks can happen, buckets can crack over time or become damaged.

    Pasta is cheap to store when it's spaghetti, but any kind of noodle that isn't flat, well it takes up a lot of space even in a five gallon bucket.

    In reality, so many of these items can be bought and stored on your shelves for a couple years and rotated without investing in many other items for long term storage.

    It all depends on how many people you have to feed and how long you want to survive anything that might go wrong.

    I personally have way too much long term food for just two people and how ever many dogs.

    My storage is based on something radical going wrong that might force my kids and grandchildren to flee the gulf coast from Florida and Texas seeking high ground in Atlanta.

    That's a lot of mouths to feed and if there would be any food rationing or shortages here also, I'm prepared to take care of them for at least a year if not longer.

    My immediate family could probably live out our lives on that stash as long as there is plenty of water, not that I don't have emergency water filters, but you still need rain.

    If push came to shove for everyone, we are not going to last very long with everyone else starving around us, but we can buy off some people for some period of time.

    I'm not dumb enough to think I can stay put and live off the land in the middle of several hundred thousand others that are not doing likewise.

    You can run to a safer area if they exist, but if there is not safe areas, you might as well stay put and die in your home versus a farm road were you ran out of gas and someone else took whatever you had with you.

    Unless you live in Salt Lake City with Mormons everywhere that preach survival, everywhere else is up for grabs.

    Well we do have one member that lives in the outback of Alaska and that sounds like a fairly safe place to stay put without being overrun by city folks or anyone or anything else.

    One other thing for those wanting to go all out with storing in five gallon buckets. They come in different type, food grade and non-food grade, strong walls and thin walls.

    Buckets like Home Depot sells is on the thin wall side and will collapse inward by simply using too much oxygen absorbers for the contents. Plus they are not food grade. Home depot does sell another 5 gallon Bucket by leaktite that is food grade, but be careful they seem to carry two identical buckets for the same price and only one say's it's food grade??? But with a price of only $4.48 each at your local HD, that's usually a better price than you can find through other sources. It is only a 70 Mil thick wall but it's designed to hold up under pressure where the HD bucket is not for some reason. If you intended to stack these buckets more than two or three high, I would opt for a 80 or 90 mil wall bucket for the bottom of the stack just to be safe. Sounds crazy, but some people have no room and stack their buckets to the ceiling in a closet.

    If you happen to live near a U-line distribution center, they sell a 75 mil wall food grade bucket for $4.30 each but you have to buy a minimum of ten, which was only a couple miles from my house and quantity was no problem.

    As far as cooking, I stock propane in a large tank and small one pound butane tanks for my butane stoves, plus a boatload of those fuel cells for cooking small items slowly and are ok for boiling water, plus they provide some heat and light and will keep food warm.
    Then I have my tank of fuel oil which is questionable at best, but it's suppose to work well in the portable heater if nothing else. I bought Styrofoam and heavy duty aluminum foil to make a solar ovens but that's only if I ever see the need coming down the line.

    God I hope everything I spent on preparedness is nothing but a waste of money for me and my children and their children and their children's children. That is, hoping no one will ever have need for any of it.
    Last edited by valerb; 21st April 2018 at 19:52.
    I'm a proud member of Eggshellman's Liar, Shill, and bully club and a new member of the Super Jew Defense League!!!

  3. #3
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    Lightbulb life requires energy

    Quote Originally Posted by valerb View Post
    God I hope everything I spent on preparedness is nothing but a waste of money for me and my children and their children and their children's children. That is, hoping no one will ever have need for any of it.
    The reality is, if one lives long enough, and "nature" does not slap one down, then fellow humans will find a way.

    Any one of these ten events could have a devastatingly catastrophic effect on the stability of our society.

    1) Fukushima Genocide Awareness
    2) Globalist Banking Crash
    3) Internet Crash
    4) Mega Earthquake
    5) Mega Volcanic Blast
    6) Meteor Strike
    7) Mutated Pandemic
    8) Pole Shift (Nibiru/Kachina)
    9) Rapid Onset Ice Age
    10) Solar Coronal Mass Ejection


    My ranking of the event's likelihood, greatest to least.
    2, 9, 1, 7, 4, 5, 3, 10, 8, 6
    And all ten come after "World War".

    I like SD Bullion's business model of focusing on survival gear.
    I just wish that they sold food products which appeal to me.
    https://sdbullion.com/survival-food/...e-food-storage
    I do not enjoy the food components (flavors) that Numanna includes,
    and I also prefer meat in some of my meals.

    Although really nice, the 30 year taste guarantee seems to be a bit excessive for me,
    as I expect that most all of our stashed foods will be consumed in the next 5 years.

    If I'm not involved with a sustainable food production lifestyle in the next few years,
    I'd better be eating sun.

    I suspect that I'll like those chicken breast meals, and if I do, then I'll stock up.
    I reckon a dozen Mountain House pouches would equal a year's worth of luxury dinners.

    After comparing the $126 MH price of 12 pouches,
    each one containing a chicken's boobs and carbohydrates,
    with the livestock infrastructure cost (and hassles)
    of raising and processing a dozen nasty chickens,
    and you too may also opt for the efficiency of instant food energy.

    In the total cost analysis of chicken production,
    I doubt if there is any substantial savings in raising your own
    when compared to buying freeze dried
    unless enough chickens are raised to supply the neighborhood.
    🐔🍗🥚
    I don't know chicken economics, and I'm unlikely to ever find out,
    I'll just try to occasionally eat some.
    "I foresee little future in 'the price of silver', I see a huge future for 'the price in silver'." - heartbone
    "The truth is called hate by those who hate the truth." - K

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by silverheartbone View Post
    The reality is, if one lives long enough, and "nature" does not slap one down, then fellow humans will find a way.

    Any one of these ten events could have a devastatingly catastrophic effect on the stability of our society.

    1) Fukushima Genocide Awareness
    2) Globalist Banking Crash
    3) Internet Crash
    4) Mega Earthquake
    5) Mega Volcanic Blast
    6) Meteor Strike
    7) Mutated Pandemic
    8) Pole Shift (Nibiru/Kachina)
    9) Rapid Onset Ice Age
    10) Solar Coronal Mass Ejection


    My ranking of the event's likelihood, greatest to least.
    2, 9, 1, 7, 4, 5, 3, 10, 8, 6
    And all ten come after "World War".

    I like SD Bullion's business model of focusing on survival gear.
    I just wish that they sold food products which appeal to me.
    https://sdbullion.com/survival-food/...e-food-storage
    I do not enjoy the food components (flavors) that Numanna includes,
    and I also prefer meat in some of my meals.

    Although really nice, the 30 year taste guarantee seems to be a bit excessive for me,
    as I expect that most all of our stashed foods will be consumed in the next 5 years.

    If I'm not involved with a sustainable food production lifestyle in the next few years,
    I'd better be eating sun.

    I suspect that I'll like those chicken breast meals, and if I do, then I'll stock up.
    I reckon a dozen Mountain House pouches would equal a year's worth of luxury dinners.

    After comparing the $126 MH price of 12 pouches,
    each one containing a chicken's boobs and carbohydrates,
    with the livestock infrastructure cost (and hassles)
    of raising and processing a dozen nasty chickens,
    and you too may also opt for the efficiency of instant food energy.

    In the total cost analysis of chicken production,
    I doubt if there is any substantial savings in raising your own
    when compared to buying freeze dried
    unless enough chickens are raised to supply the neighborhood.
    ������
    I don't know chicken economics, and I'm unlikely to ever find out,
    I'll just try to occasionally eat some.


    Not really a luxury dinner, 12 pouches is only 24 meals consisting of 210 calories for a price of $5.25 each. But I bet a whole chicken breast is going to taste better than chicken bits.

    You might try looking at the multi packs versus paying for 12 individual packs which is only $110 for two packs of 6.

    You do not need to cook when using canned cheese or canned butter, but you can use them in your cooked meals.

    I think you might want to try eating some more of the things you plan on surviving on long term and actually think about eating the same things over and over again.

    The last thing anyone needs in a time of serious stress is a stressful diet that they have to eat. Surviving on the same foods you normally eat is the best way to help cope with any situation.

    I'm nowhere as worried about the effects of a long term financial global problem as I am the natural disasters that can be real game changers for centuries if not forever.

    I can handle a pandemic if I know it's coming, even an airborne problem as long as no one needs emergency medical treatment.

    I just can't be in the early stages and hope to come out alive with any certainty.

    A world war, that's probably one of the worst possible scenarios if we have nuclear customers on the opposing side.

    Someone saying to hell with it, we've lost, so lets take them with us.

    There is nothing I can do to hide from a nuclear blast anywhere near my home and I'm not building an underground blast cave, plus I can't survive a direct hit from a bomb or most any other projectile.

    I don't need any more food, but if I know something bad is coming, I'm heading for Kroger's and buying all the chips I can get my hands on and several 30 packs of Budweiser's.

    Then its off to Aldi's to buy up all the 6 packs of German beer they carry as it actually has a very long shelf life versus American beer.

    There are some things one just doesn't want to go without at any time!!!

    Then I'll worry about loading up on the less essential items like bottled water.
    I'm a proud member of Eggshellman's Liar, Shill, and bully club and a new member of the Super Jew Defense League!!!

  5. #5
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    Default storage in glass

    Quote Originally Posted by valerb View Post
    I don't need any more food, but if I know something bad is coming, I'm heading for Kroger's and buying all the chips I can get my hands on and several 30 packs of Budweiser's.

    Then its off to Aldi's to buy up all the 6 packs of German beer they carry as it actually has a very long shelf life versus American beer.

    There are some things one just doesn't want to go without at any time!!!

    Then I'll worry about loading up on the less essential items like bottled water.
    How long does German beer last?

    Speaking of water, I'll need to get some distilled water for CS generation,
    and the water must be transferred into glass jugs for long term storage.
    Why do gallon glass bottles with caps cost so much?
    "I foresee little future in 'the price of silver', I see a huge future for 'the price in silver'." - heartbone
    "The truth is called hate by those who hate the truth." - K

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by silverheartbone View Post
    How long does German beer last?

    Speaking of water, I'll need to get some distilled water for CS generation,
    and the water must be transferred into glass jugs for long term storage.
    Why do gallon glass bottles with caps cost so much?

    I just bought a 30 pack of Budweiser last week and it has a use by date of June 28th and Budweiser does start to go flat not long after that use by date, it's a slow process, but you can tell.

    Most of the beer from Germany has a use by date of at least a year or longer after you buy it. I just looked at two bottles I happen to have left in the fridge and the use by date is September 2018 and I can't remember when I bought them.

    I remember testing the beer Aldi sells to see how long it would really last and it was months longer than the use by date, but I can't remember how many month in total, just to run to Aldi and empty their shelf in an emergency if possible.

    I don't know what kind of prices your seeing for glass jugs, but I would assume you would want an Amber glass for maximum storing capability of your CS solution.

    I pretty much use U-line for most of the things I need in volume and fortunately they are only a few miles from my house so no delivery charge.

    They happen to sell 1/2 gallon jugs in both clear and Amber by the case lot of 6 for $3.25 each or $19.50 per case, if that is a bargain price and you can use that many.

    The also sell a one gallon jug but only in clear glass with a case quantity of four at $4.35 each or $17.40 plus shipping.

    If these prices are any good check out U-lines page

    https://www.uline.com/BL_8215/Glass-...ass+Containers

    Shipping was going to be really cheap to ship a bunch of 5 gallon bucket to my house but I chose to just pick them up myself.

    The have a location in Minneapolis and Chicago so not a lot of long distance shipping for you.

    If your comparing prices on Amazon, they would probably be more expensive and including shipping charges to be competitive.

    As far a why the expense, it's glass and not plastic that they can run off a machine in a hurry. I've worked in glass plants with plate and molded glassware.

    No matter how advanced technology becomes, to make glass, you need heat and a lot of it.

    It's so much heavier than plastic to ship and it has to be shipped at least twice in most cases just to reach the store, so it's energy cost heavy and shipping cost heavy.
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