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Thread: Longterm Butter Storage

  1. #1
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    Default Longterm Butter Storage

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    Last edited by Sue-Z-Q; 8th January 2010 at 15:22.
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sue-Z-Q View Post
    For about 35 years I have told those who wanted to follow my deeper and deeper treks into home canning and shelf-food storage (as opposed to relying on a deep freeze) "When it comes to home preservation with a pressure cooker, you can can $hit. It won't TASTE good but it SURE WILL LAST!"

    Hubs and youngster who is into this were talking, and youngster who buys nitro packed stuff and pays a wad for shelf-life of 30 years said they had butter, and hubs was interested, said he'd like some, and then I saw the cost of it. About had a coronary. I'm going to buy some butter, melt it, put it in pint jars, leave sufficient headspace so that the butter doesn't bubble up under the lid flats, and process it at 5 of 10 lbs. pressure for probably 15 minutes. I would think even if it separates one could shake it up, and before use, chill it and whip with a whisk.

    Anyone done anything like this? In these times of stocking ahead I can't see paying umpteen times the basic cost of an item for 30 year shelf life. I doubt I'll be here then even if everything goes just hunky-dory in the world, LOL. Rule of thumb if you can buy it canned somewhere you can can it at home.

    I bought some canned butter with a long shelf life and it actually tasted pretty good. For our purposes, a little butter for baking and a little for toast is quite enough. The canned stuff is very expensive, but will be worth it's weight in silver at some point. We have ten 3 pound cans. That should last a good long time. I am actually curious about Crisco cooking grease. How long will this stuff last in the can before it goes sour?
    "Information spreads at the speed of light, while ignorance is instantaneous at all points in the known universe"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sue-Z-Q View Post
    Anyone done anything like this? In these times of stocking ahead I can't see paying umpteen times the basic cost of an item for 30 year shelf life. I doubt I'll be here then even if everything goes just hunky-dory in the world, LOL. Rule of thumb if you can buy it canned somewhere you can can it at home.
    I've never done this, but I was looking at a case lot add tonight and I saw an add for canned butter and I thought about picking some up until I saw the price. Here it was $4.25 for a 12 oz can. I love butter, but I can't justify that price. We've done quite a bit of canning, but I've never tried to can butter before. I like your statement about canning at home. I think I'll give it a try. Let me know how yours works out.

  4. #4
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    Smile

    Please let us know if this works Suzie, if it does I'm definately going to do it.

  5. #5
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    my mom says you just melt it slow then you can it , but dont burn it just melt it
    Knowing the future direction and price of gold will be useless for anyone who invests in paper gold! In the near future "timing" will be nothing. What you are holding will be everything!"

  6. #6
    chux03 Guest

  7. #7
    sunsetcliff Guest

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    I dont can, but when I see candles that are thrown out- I grab them. I can melt the wax for use.

    BTW- I wont eat margarine.

    Butter is better.

  8. #8
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    I know that in the old days before refrigeration, folks used to store butter in a 2 piece pottery container. One piece was cup-like with no handle, and the other piece was a larger diameter curved saucer with a (say) 5/8" raised ring all around the top of the saucer.

    Butter was placed in the cup and the cup placed upside down on the saucer. The rim of the cup settled snuggly against the outside the raised ring on the saucer, and water was placed in the saucer between the rim of the cup and the upward curved rim of the saucer. The curvature of the saucer was designed so that the depth of the water was not higher then the top of the ring on the saucer....so the water couldn't flow under the rim of the cup and be high enough to overflow the ring and touch the butter.

    The result was that the water effectively "sealed" out air which allowed the butter to be stored for quite a while.

    Seems if this preserved butter for some period, then pressure canning which also seals out air should be a good preserver also. But I suspect for longivity it will be important to store the canned butter in a cool dark location?
    Last edited by goldminer; 13th March 2009 at 06:15.

  9. #9
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    I just did 8 pounds the other day. It filled just over 11 pints. Its very easy and there are some good step by step instructions online if you google: canning butter.

    The secret is to shake the cans occasionally as it is cooling.

  10. #10
    akak Guest

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    One thing I am wondering about in all this talk about preserving butter --- is this clarified butter, what Indians would call "ghee"? Because butter from the store is whipped up with a certain amount of water and milk solids, but as soon as you melt it, which all these procedures would do, it is going to separate anyway. The thing is, once you separate out the water and milk solids, butter will last quite a while just sealed away from air (oxygen), as Sue-Z-Q has described, so it seems to me that there would really be no need to actually can it. You could just seal and freeze the clarified butter for long-term storage, and if and when the power goes out, it will still last for months from that point on, even if the power never comes back on.


    Once again, though, for those who want to explore long-term food storage, I cannot recommend highly enough investing in a vaccuum-sealer. Oxygen is by far the worst enemy of food in storage, and used properly, a vaccuum-sealer can remove 95 to 100% (often 100%) of the air and oxygen trapped within food. It can multiply the effective storage life of foods by many times over, and they are not hard to use at all. For $100 or less at any Costco, you can buy a home model no bigger than a toaster that will pay for itself within the first year for sure. Using one not only greatly slows or stops oxidation, but will greatly diminish or eliminate freezer burn in frozen foods as well. I find it the single most valuable item for food preservation available to the individual (vaccuum-freezing is NOT a viable home method of preservation, due to the complex and highly expensive machinery).
    Last edited by akak; 20th March 2009 at 17:06.

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