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Thread: At what price would you start to sell your silver holdings?

  1. #1
    Ardent Listener Guest

    Default At what price would you start to sell your silver holdings?

    At what price would start to sell-off at least some of your silver holdings?

  2. #2
    Ardent Listener Guest

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    None of the above.

  3. #3
    silvers Guest

    Default No way

    You will see me depart with my silver at these levels. Just like gold, the train has just left the station but the journey will be long.

  4. #4
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    We're in it for life, and death will not release you.

    Actually I'm not going to sell at a trigger price but wait for the ratio to come down to 40 or so.

  5. #5
    Jake is offline Silver Seeker Senior Member Site Admin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ardent Listener View Post
    At what price would start to sell-off at least some of your silver holdings?
    That's like asking..."At what point will you sell the dollar bills in your wallet?"
    Answer:...When I need to buy goods or services with it. Fortunately, I don't need to do this now, but, in the future, I envision a time when I either sell or trade small amounts of my silver for what I need such as a can of beans for a mercury dime, or a box of Kellogg's Corn Flakes for a 1957 ave. circulated condition quarter.

    I gathered the price per oz. data for Kellogg's Corn Flakes going back to 1946, compared it to the price of silver per oz. to determine how silver has kept up with the price of a product that has essentually not changed in 70 years.

    My attached Thumbnail shows that the same amount of silver can be used today as was required in 1946 to buy a box of Kellogs Corn Flakes:

    The moral of the story?
    Hold your silver and you will discover that generally, you'll be able to buy the same stuff in the future for the same amount of silver you have today even if inflation sends those products higher.
    Last edited by Jake; 15th November 2009 at 17:28.

  6. #6
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    Default When I need to buy something in cash.....

    but not before $200 an ounce! Unless of course I lose my job. Then things might be different..

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake View Post
    That's like asking..."At what point will you sell the dollar bills in your wallet?"
    Answer:...When I need to buy goods or services with it. Fortunately, I don't need to do this now, but, in the future, I envision a time when I either sell or trade small amounts of my silver for what I need such as a can of beans for a mercury dime, or a box of Kellogg's Corn Flakes for a 1957 ave. circulated condition quarter.

    I gathered the price per oz. data for Kellogg's Corn Flakes going back to 1946, compared it to the price of silver per oz. to determine how silver has kept up with the price of a product that has essentually not changed in 70 years.

    My attached Thumbnail shows that the same amount of silver can be used today as was required in 1946 to buy a box of Kellogs Corn Flakes:

    The moral of the story?
    Hold your silver and you will discover that generally, you'll be able to buy the same stuff in the future for the same amount of silver you have today even if inflation sends those products higher.
    That's true at today's prices for Silver, but that wasn't the case just a few years ago when silver was hugging $4 - $5 an ounce. Now if it will just get back to it's historical ratio with Gold, which would put us at $65, you'll be able to buy a case of corn flakes for the same amount of Silver.

    It doesn't matter what the price of Silver is, if it's due to hyperinflation. However, if it's due to a Silver shortage, I think I will start unloading in one thousand ounce chunks at around $50, assuming the spot price is in a sideways move. Kind of dumb to unload if it's jumping two or three dollars or more per day. I plan on holding on to the bulk of my Silver, in case it ever reaches the mythical $100 plus figure. I would just hate to see it go to $70 or $80 and then have it crash without cashing in on my original investment.

    The $50 level is not that great of a return if you bought in at $17, but It's a great return for the old timers that bought in a $4 - $5. So I would expect a lot of those that jumped in late to hold on for a much higher figure than $50 an ounce, just like those of us that did buy at $4 -$5 are holding on for much higher numbers than we see today.

    Then there are those that bought in at $17 and will sell when it's in the $20's, some just looking to make a quick turn around, while others will sell for fear it will drop back down again.

    I just don't want to be one of those that never sells because they are always waiting for the top, which no one will ever know what that is until it's behind them.

    There were probably an awful lot of people that didn't sell their Silver back in 1980, waiting for it to keep climbing and when it started to drop, they hung on, hoping it would climb back up again. You know there are some out there that bought in the $40 range and are still holding it today, waiting to break even.

    Sooner or later, that Silver express is going to depart the station and it's any one's guess what the last stop will be.

  8. #8
    Jake is offline Silver Seeker Senior Member Site Admin
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    Quote Originally Posted by valerb@bellsouth.net View Post
    That's true at today's prices for Silver, but that wasn't the case just a few years ago when silver was hugging $4 - $5 an ounce. Now if it will just get back to it's historical ratio with Gold, which would put us at $65, you'll be able to buy a case of corn flakes for the same amount of Silver.

    It doesn't matter what the price of Silver is, if it's due to hyperinflation. However, if it's due to a Silver shortage, I think I will start unloading in one thousand ounce chunks at around $50, assuming the spot price is in a sideways move. Kind of dumb to unload if it's jumping two or three dollars or more per day. I plan on holding on to the bulk of my Silver, in case it ever reaches the mythical $100 plus figure. I would just hate to see it go to $70 or $80 and then have it crash without cashing in on my original investment.

    The $50 level is not that great of a return if you bought in at $17, but It's a great return for the old timers that bought in a $4 - $5. So I would expect a lot of those that jumped in late to hold on for a much higher figure than $50 an ounce, just like those of us that did buy at $4 -$5 are holding on for much higher numbers than we see today.

    Then there are those that bought in at $17 and will sell when it's in the $20's, some just looking to make a quick turn around, while others will sell for fear it will drop back down again.

    I just don't want to be one of those that never sells because they are always waiting for the top, which no one will ever know what that is until it's behind them.

    There were probably an awful lot of people that didn't sell their Silver back in 1980, waiting for it to keep climbing and when it started to drop, they hung on, hoping it would climb back up again. You know there are some out there that bought in the $40 range and are still holding it today, waiting to break even.

    Sooner or later, that Silver express is going to depart the station and it's any one's guess what the last stop will be.
    What are you rambling on about?

  9. #9
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    $5 an ounce would do it for me.
    That's when I started buying and by the time it gets there again I will cash out because the Dollar will be huge and all the anti-Silver Bugs will have been proven right.
    Also the St. Louis Rams look a lock for a playoff birth and subsequent SuperBowl victory with a last second 99 yard Hail Mary touchdown pass against the Oakland Raiders for the most exciting SuperBowl spectacle ever.
    Uhhh,,What was the question again? Beers are going down good today.

  10. #10
    Jake is offline Silver Seeker Senior Member Site Admin
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    Quote Originally Posted by skijake View Post
    $5 an ounce would do it for me.
    That's when I started buying and by the time it gets there again I will cash out because the Dollar will be huge and all the anti-Silver Bugs will have been proven right.
    Also the St. Louis Rams look a lock for a playoff birth and subsequent SuperBowl victory with a last second 99 yard Hail Mary touchdown pass against the Oakland Raiders for the most exciting SuperBowl spectacle ever.
    Uhhh,,What was the question again? Beers are going down good today.
    Yep...Watching Penn State
    10 to 3 over Northwestern

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