PDA

View Full Version : Cryogenic engine



Daveman
27th April 2008, 23:56
Sounds too good to be true.

http://www.kfor.com/Global/story.asp?s=3390503

Need some professional opinion

Kelly
28th April 2008, 17:22
That's very interesting, but I sure wish the author had bothered to explain WHY it works. It'd be nice to know what the scientific principals are behind what he's doing.

Daveman
28th April 2008, 20:06
NASCAR drivers have allegedly borrowed his cyogenic trick, so apparently this guy didn't get buried by the government.

Sure would like to know if this stuff works.

amadeus
12th May 2008, 20:25
OK quick let's cash in on this guy's tech and win the $10 million Progressive Automotive X prize....you could buy a lot of silver with that kind of money ;)

http://progressiveautoxprize.org/

Godcopp
15th May 2008, 13:54
Sounds too good to be true.

http://www.kfor.com/Global/story.asp?s=3390503

Need some professional opinion

New here and a new silver buff. I had to weigh in on this, however.

Cryo tempering metal has been around awhile, but it is gaining popularity in some circles. It has been proven to slightly strengthen metals. I work with firearms and a few gun manufacturers are using it on gun barrels to increase it's longevity and strength, and therefore accuracy, slightly.

But let me stress this, that article is complete bunk as there is no way that improving the existing metal in an internal combustion engine could ever improve the efficiency more that a sub-fractional amount. NASCAR guys use it to keep their high stress cars from breaking, not to improve fuel efficiency.

If it sounds to good to be true...

pkrebaum
1st August 2008, 07:06
Too good to be true.
No metals treatment process is going to fundamentally alter the way the engine converts gasoline into horsepower. Even if it magically eliminated all engine friction mileage would only increase by 10%. The only true way to compare things is to put the car on a dynamometer.

That said, there are "hypermilers" out there who can get 100 MPG in a hybrid, but most would consider many of their techniques either dangerous (such as drafting closely behind a semi) or inconvenient. Some of their stuff is simple and logical though, you might want to visit some of their websites and pick up a few tips. Even an extra 5 MPG at these gas prices helps.

mick silver
1st August 2008, 08:35
he just harding the metal parts