PDA

View Full Version : Info about gold confiscation



TomAlciere
22nd April 2008, 06:11
People who grew up being taught that America was a free country will find it hard to believe this could happen in America. How could United States coins from the Philadelphia mint be contraband? I have a few news clips about it from my local newspaper, posted on my website.

http://silverismoney.info/gold

The important thing is that whatever your interest, if it is covered by the newspaper microfilms at your library, is this:

Last time I was there, if you wanted a copy, you had to plunk a coin in and get a hard (to read) copy. Now, the microfilm reader acts like a scanner, too, allowing me to convert what's on the screen to a .TIF file which I can then convert to a .JPG and upload. Genealogists and other historians will find this especially useful because the copy I made and printed at home is much better than what would have come off the microfilm reader printer. If your local library isn't at this level of technology yet, it probably will be soon.

Robin
23rd April 2008, 08:46
That's why its good to collect coins for numismatics purposes. when all that happened the government did not touch collecter coins.

FedFixNix
23rd April 2008, 21:43
People who grew up being taught that America was a free country will find it hard to believe this could happen in America. How could United States coins from the Philadelphia mint be contraband? I have a few news clips about it from my local newspaper, posted on my website.

http://silverismoney.info/gold

The important thing is that whatever your interest, if it is covered by the newspaper microfilms at your library, is this:

Last time I was there, if you wanted a copy, you had to plunk a coin in and get a hard (to read) copy. Now, the microfilm reader acts like a scanner, too, allowing me to convert what's on the screen to a .TIF file which I can then convert to a .JPG and upload. Genealogists and other historians will find this especially useful because the copy I made and printed at home is much better than what would have come off the microfilm reader printer. If your local library isn't at this level of technology yet, it probably will be soon.

The link you posted is not about coins. It's about the 1933 gold confiscations.