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AG.Phil
16th April 2008, 15:57
Most of my silver I buy from sites, 10oz quantities which come by parcel mail. Occasionally though, if the bidding doesn't go too high, I purchase items from eBay.
Up until recently I've had no problem, until two eagles failed to arrive. The seller, whom I trust, has submitted a claim form to Royal Mail. My guess is a dishonest postal worker now knows what's in the little packages I've been receiving. This week I received an empty package, a slit had been cut into the bottom edge and two 1oz buffalo bars removed. I shall not be ordering items through letter post again, at least not until I feel it's safe again. I understand this is common in the U.K., and a growing problem.

Has anyone else experienced this? Does it happen in the U.S.

Just getting it "off my chest."

Al.

buggles
16th April 2008, 17:03
I have only had one foodstuff item pilfered in USPS mail and that was over a decade ago.

I have had coins arrive in packages that made it obvious they contained coins.

I have received packages from Royal Mail that took several weeks to make it over the pond and then others ran quicker than USPS. Royal Mail strikes me as being rather inconsistent but I am certainly in no position to make any qualified statements concerning their service.

AG.Phil
16th April 2008, 17:50
I think that generally, Royal Mail provides a good service, but they do seem to have a problem with pilfering by some of their staff. Most of the bullion sellers on eBay that I've dealt with, seem wise to this, and disguise items by wrapping them before placing in jiffy bags.
I'm wondering how Royal Mail will react to my complaint. Strictly speaking I'm not entitled to compensation on precious metal sent "recorded delivery," apparently it should be sent "registered post" to qualify for compensation, or so I believe.
I wonder how I stand in a case of obvious theft by Royal Mail staff. I also wonder how seriously their security department will treat the incident

I have a feeling that U.S mail services are more concerned about customer service and presumably treat their customers better than Royal Mail.
A common example of poor service by Royal Mail is when the you have to go to the sorting office to collect "recorded delivery" items because the postman could not be bothered to ring the doorbell and ask you to sign for your package, he just shoves a little red card through the letter box instead. I've experienced that several times. My wife once watched the red card come through the door, so she opened the door quickly and called the postman back. His excuse was that he was behind schedule. I can put up with that, but not with the theft. These people are in trusted positions and as such must be the "the lowest of the low" to break that trust.

TTAZZMAN
16th April 2008, 23:16
I have recieved hundreds of packages....with bullion

the only package i ever lost was shipped from canada (1/2oz gold)....canadian shipping insurance covered it

I have however noticed USPS often will post a delivery confirmation online 1-2days before i actually recieve the package

And i have had Signiture confirmation packages delivered and left in the mail box via USPS never signed for

AG.Phil
17th April 2008, 01:15
I have recieved hundreds of packages....with bullion

the only package i ever lost was shipped from canada (1/2oz gold)....canadian shipping insurance covered it

I have however noticed USPS often will post a delivery confirmation online 1-2days before i actually recieve the package

And i have had Signiture confirmation packages delivered and left in the mail box via USPS never signed for

I've had the same here, what we call "recorded delivery" items shoved through the door instead of handed to the recipient. That could leave an honest seller "high and dry" if the buyer is dishonest.

buggles
17th April 2008, 06:57
You will probably have to bite the bullet on this one.
I am completely ignorant to Royal Mail workings but I am certain that if they have a way off the hook they will use it. The insured mail is there for you to use specifically for this purpose (nice mail you have there, would hate for something bad to happen to it).

You might try getting to know your delivery personnel.
I know my delivery folks. I've had conversations with them. I know how many delivery people are on my route, their names and what they look like. I'd say I'm lucky in that my postmen are extremely nice and talkative and I would be blown away if they left a package in even a damaged state without notifying me.
Think of your postman as an extension of your coin dealer. He is part of the chain that puts PMs into your hands.

I'd wager that the personal rapport I've established with my mail delivery people goes a long ways towards keeping them honest with my mail in particular. Also, if something does go funny I know exactly who was on route that day and which PO to file a complaint with.

7nomads
17th April 2008, 09:08
Well, the one time was about five years ago. Caught 2 rolls of quarters for $58 (the good old days). The shipper send all 80 quarters loose in a priority mail envelope. The envelope arrived with one tiny tear in the edge. Fortunately I just happen to be outside when my mail arrived. The postman (nice guy) handled about 10 letters. I quickly looked through it and showed him my empty envelope so the claim was no problem.

Of course I don't think USPS insures coins any more (nor does ups, talk to AJPM about 10 boxes of gold if you don't believe me).

The best is registered mail. Up to $25,000 per package and not that much more. Kind of a hassle (no clear tape, only the old brown stuff) for the shipper as well as the postman, but it works.

buggles
17th April 2008, 11:18
You are correct that neither USPS or UPS will insure coins.
I was aware of the USPS policy but recently learned of the UPS policy while reading a list of items they do not ship at a depot counter. Coins and high value collectibles were specifically listed.

USPS Registered Mail will insure coins at over their face value.

I have been told (at the same UPS counter) that Fed-Ex will insure coins but I have not verified that information.

AG.Phil
17th April 2008, 14:30
You will probably have to bite the bullet on this one.
I am completely ignorant to Royal Mail workings but I am certain that if they have a way off the hook they will use it. The insured mail is there for you to use specifically for this purpose (nice mail you have there, would hate for something bad to happen to it).

You might try getting to know your delivery personnel.
I know my delivery folks. I've had conversations with them. I know how many delivery people are on my route, their names and what they look like. I'd say I'm lucky in that my postmen are extremely nice and talkative and I would be blown away if they left a package in even a damaged state without notifying me.
Think of your postman as an extension of your coin dealer. He is part of the chain that puts PMs into your hands.

I'd wager that the personal rapport I've established with my mail delivery people goes a long ways towards keeping them honest with my mail in particular. Also, if something does go funny I know exactly who was on route that day and which PO to file a complaint with.

You might be right, but they won't shake me off easily. This is obvious theft by a postal worker so I'm hoping the Royal Mail will accept responsibility. If the seller had offered insured mail as an option, I would have payed the extra pound or two.

I doubt the actual postman is involved. The envelope package was cut in such a way that no one would notice. My son didn't notice when he signed for it. The culprit is more likely to be someone in the sorting office. I agree with your sentiments though. Make friends with everyone, that's me. Especially those supplying a service.