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LETMYSILVERGO
6th September 2009, 23:35
SO, JP MORGAN'S RATING HAS BEEN MOVED to UNDERWEIGHT.


ANYONE KNOW WHAT THIS COULD POSSIBLE MEAN??? uhhhhhhhhh





TITAN INDUSTRIES

RESEARCH: JP MORGAN

RATING: UNDERWEIGHT

CMP: RS 1238

JP Morgan maintains `Underweight' rating on Titan Industries. High gold prices
keep consumers on sidelines as they refrain from fresh purchases. Price resistance remains high despite gold prices being stable for the past five months and it appears consumers may take more time to adjust to these levels.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/JP-Morgan-puts-underweight-on-Titan-Industries/articleshow/4980253.cms

DaleFromCalgary
7th September 2009, 09:35
"Price resistance remains high despite gold prices being stable for the past five months and it appears consumers may take more time to adjust to these levels."

In North America it may be that people don't have an awful lot spare change to buy bullion, what with foreclosures, lay-offs, credit card debt, and second-mortgage debt (= home equity loans).

MiloMorai
7th September 2009, 13:29
"Price resistance remains high despite gold prices being stable for the past five months and it appears consumers may take more time to adjust to these levels."

In North America it may be that people don't have an awful lot spare change to buy bullion, what with foreclosures, lay-offs, credit card debt, and second-mortgage debt (= home equity loans).

Except for the goldbugs And Silverbugs who will go without a meal
for a week if that means they can purchase another ounce of
their precious metal :D

Silvature
7th September 2009, 13:32
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Except for the goldbugs And Silverbugs who will go without a meal
for a week if that means they can purchase another ounce of
their precious metal :D




I'm hungry

maplesilverbug
7th September 2009, 13:44
In North America it may be that people don't have an awful lot spare change to buy bullion, what with foreclosures, lay-offs, credit card debt, and second-mortgage debt (= home equity loans).

That's exactly what I posted. (http://forums.silverseek.com/showpost.php?p=69125&postcount=21)