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Paul
1st June 2009, 05:52
I should be sleeping as I have a night shift tonight, but it's so hot here and someone's having a new roof done so I will post here in a sleep-deprived stupor instead.

What is your strangest piece of silver? I have a clock that has 90% (and one 40%) coins around the face. I fell in love with it when I saw it on ebay and just had to have it. I got it imported from the USA and paid roughly the same in postage as I did for the item itself.

I would really hate to part with it now though and it keeps pretty good time!

podrag
1st June 2009, 06:07
I have some old Egyptian silver coins celebrating the defeat of the British at Suez.

I have some 1920s 800 silver German hunting trophies that are almost definately war loot.

I have an East German 10 mark silver coin.

I have some silver spoons with a Peacock stamped on the back which means they were probably used to fund the War of Independence.

And I have some wired colourized ASEs with holograms and pictures and such.

theo68
1st June 2009, 13:03
I have a one ounce art round with an image of Santa Claus on it that I bought at the local flea market. The interesting thing is that the artist made Santa look somewhat sinister. I keep it around as a conversation piece.

About your sleeping issue; try plugging in a fan. Aside from the obvious cooling effects, it may create enough white noise to deaden any outside sounds.

theo68
1st June 2009, 13:07
I have some old Egyptian silver coins celebrating the defeat of the British at Suez.




Cool! Now there's a conversation piece. How did you get a hold of those? Post a picture if you can.

Argyria
1st June 2009, 23:35
I've got a 1/4 ounce art bar celebrating the USA bicentennial with a picture of a minuteman on the front surrounded by the words, "Continental American Minuteman". Weight and purity are stamped on the back, which is otherwise smooth.

akak
2nd June 2009, 02:02
I have an antique pair of solid silver chopsticks from China, where they were used by the imperial family and the elites. Supposedly, the theory was that the chopsticks would turn black if exposed to food that had been poisoned, a constant worry among the powerful in old China (and maybe today's China too?). I suspect that even if they did work as advertised, the diner would have eaten a fatal dose of poison before the chopsticks had turned black. They are beautifully engraved, though, and are connected by a fine silver chain to keep the pair together.

podrag
2nd June 2009, 03:04
Cool! Now there's a conversation piece. How did you get a hold of those? Post a picture if you can.

I will when I get the chance. I don't live in the same place I keep my stash so it might take a while.

I might start a 'show and tell' thread.

Paul
2nd June 2009, 08:59
The wonderful thing about collectable stuff in silver is that it isn't churned out (i.e. like plastic chopsticks and nickel-plated coins).

Thanks for the sleeping advice, I slept the sleep of the dead today... Dream't about my silver.

Yabezlas
2nd June 2009, 19:21
Mine is a filligree heart locket and chain. It is fairly large. I "won" it at a white elephant party about 25+ years ago. The "gifter" had received it from a fond relative, but she was aghast to wear it. Therefore, she gifted it away.

duneyman jr
3rd June 2009, 10:22
i have a silver spoons season 1 on dvd.

Steadfast
3rd June 2009, 21:07
My strangest silver item is also my prized piece of silver!
As I have posted before:


Believe it or not,
my prized peice of silver is my avatar!

I Own an Ancient silver Roman coin, minted in 100 bc. by C. Vibius C.F. Pansa, It was even struck in Judea, too!

How do I know?
The "provence mark" on these Roman Repubic wide coins is located under the chin of Alexander Jannaeus' face on the other side.
The mark on mine is of a shepard's crook, which was made popular by this coin in that area.
This same type of Shepards crook was used by Harrod, his sons, and by Pilote on their coins 100 years later.

Before 95 BC, a religious and political group who caused dissension in Israel, was the Pharisees, who opposed the established priesthood, which were at that time called the Sadducees. Eventually, in about 90BC after six years of strife, backed by Roman silver which they where granted by Alexander to strike, the Pharisees were able to seize rule over the country and control of the Temple in Jerusalem. Having taken the bribe, the Pharisees allowed Pompey, who was then Roman emperor, to arrive in Damascus in 63 BC. A Jewish delegation (including a person named Antipater) arrived to ask him to allow them to return to the priestly form of government. Pompey seeing Israel had already embraced Roman coins, decided instead to kill them all and occupy Jerusalem.

Ironically it was these same type silver tribute coin and same roman silver in them that was not only used by the preists to betray Israel into Roman rule, but also the same coins used by Judas to betray Jesus.

When I bought the coin, The shop owner and I weighed the real roman silver coin, ran the math X30, and I now have a small leather bag containing the exact amount of silver by weight that Judas sold out Jesus for. And it is a shocking 3.9 ounces of silver! (The weight of 48 mercury silver US dimes) It is sad and pathetic how little the bag weighs. Holding it, makes you want to weep for how cheaply Judas sold out his own soul.

So, how cheaply do we sell our souls for, today?

Argyria
4th June 2009, 00:17
"I Own an Ancient silver Roman coin, minted in 100 bc. by C. Vibius C.F. Pansa, It was even struck in Judea, too!"

That is an awesome story! The best unusual piece(s) of silver yet, IMO.

Zoltan
4th June 2009, 21:38
I have a 1 oz. art bar with a nice lion on the face.

Stamped 1 oz. fine silver. Not quite a Roman coin but kind of neat.

Scandalous the <4 oz. Judas story (always assumed it was 30 coins = 30 oz.).

Z.

Prospector
7th June 2009, 20:19
I once bought a bag of "scrap sterling". One item in it was utterly strange. It looked like a knife handle with no blade. I kept it just to stare at it. By chance I saw a piece just like it on Ebay and it sold for fifty bux! I took another look at my strange piece and sure enough, it was a telephone dialer. So I promptly offered it on Ebay.

My description:
About a thousand years ago, dialing a telephone meant physically turning the dial to the desired digit. Most people used a pencil, and merchants often gave away a plastic tool with an advertising message on it. Here is a sterling silver telephone dialer 4 3/4" long. One side is engraved "Cinderella Frocks", the other is stamped in very small letters "STERLING HANDLE". The entire piece is covered with fine scratches consistent with normal use. Overall a lovely bit of history.

It sold for $25. (The one that went for $50 was an elaborate Tiffany piece. Mine wasn't.)

fansubs_ca
8th June 2009, 00:20
About a thousand years ago, dialing a telephone meant physically turning the dial to the desired digit. Most people used a pencil, and merchants often gave away a plastic tool with an advertising message on it.

I'm old enough to remember the last few years of rotary dial. Apparently I
now have one more sign we were poor, we dialed with our fingers! Either
that or it was a strange local custom to my city. ;)

Can't say I own anything unusual in silver, all pretty standard rounds or coins.