PDA

View Full Version : Cleaning your 90% silver



theelementofone
21st April 2009, 13:58
Ok, never thought I would ask this. Is it alright to clean your 90% (junk) coins? Would this affect the value at all? (meaning will it decrease the value?) If it's ok, then what would yall recomend?

I have a lot of Junk that has some debris on it, that bothers the hell out of me :)

Thanks in advance

fullsafe
21st April 2009, 16:07
If your thiinking about cleaning that 1889 cc , don't do it! I don't know how but collectors that pay big bucks for numismatic coins can tell if the coins have been cleaned or not. It's much smarter to leave them in the actual condition than think you will increase it's value with cleaning. That tarnish will actually pay you diidends if you leave it alone. As for cleaning true junk 90% coins , I don't know why you would want to waste your time. In normal or even most uncirculated conditions there is virtually no numismatic value to regular pre-64 coins. They are worth .715 ounces X spot/1$ face value regardless of condition.

LoboNoches
21st April 2009, 16:14
They are worth .715 ounces X spot/1$ face value regardless of condition.[/quote]

Where is a good place for one to start looking to gather 90% coins for reasonable price.I don't have the kind of money to order the huge bags I see online but would like to diversify

theelementofone
21st April 2009, 16:19
Your local coin shop. Or just ask the older people, I hav gone through tons of old coin jars from friends. Found quite a Treasure. If not try coin roll hunting.

fullsafe
21st April 2009, 16:25
Actually , what it's worth and what you have to pay to get it are two different things which is why I have not bought a dimes worth since silver retraced from 20 and the premiums have stayed so high. Your local coin shop would be the best place to start and hope people have sold some back to them that the dealer doesn't want 14 times face for. Occasionally e-bay has some attractive buys but don't forget shippng. I think people paying big premiums( more than 5%) need to have their heads examined because that cost is not coming back at resale unless you have a terrific move in spot. Most dealers (online or local) will pay spot at most and usually 3 to 5 % less than spot. Good luck , you will need it!

PSUDave
21st April 2009, 19:00
Never clean any coin. You'll kill any numismatic value that it'll ever have.

akak
21st April 2009, 19:19
Never clean any coin. You'll kill any numismatic value that it'll ever have.


That is very true, PSUDave --- if any coin has ANY possible collector value, or future value, then DON'T CLEAN IT IN ANY WAY!!!


Now, if it is bars you are talking about, or VERY common and circulated 90% silver, then I would say that it is up to you. I would only clean the most tarnished and/or dirty bars or coins, however. I have done it myself, mostly to remove tarnish using TARNEX, which will almost instantly return the silver to a very bright and shiny form. But as a number of people have pointed out, the more blackened and tarnished the piece that is cleaned with TARNEX originally was, the more prone it will be to re-tarnishing, and much faster than it originally did (there are complicated chemical reasons for this, but it is a fact). If you are going to use TARNEX on any silver, I would recommend vacuum-sealing the piece(s) or otherwise sealing it from any exposure to air, as it is sulfurous gases in the atmosphere that make silver tarnish, so cutting off any contact with air will prevent it from happening. Now, it WILL begin to tarnish again once removed from its bag or packaging, but hopefully you will be selling it at that point, and the problem will be in the next owner's hands.

hiyosilver
21st April 2009, 21:28
If you're sure it has no additional numismatic value, run a sink of hot water with dish washing liquid. Dump your coins in a colander and lower them into the soapy water and let them soak. The hotter the better. I usually add a pot of boiling water I heated on the stove to it. After the water cools enough, just put your hands in and run your fingers through it over and over....(hehe, you should enjoy that).....then rinse well under running water and spread out on a towel to dry. It cleans it up pretty good, but the main thing, it gets rid of the odor of years of dead bacteria on it.

Argyria
21st April 2009, 21:30
That is very true, PSUDave --- if any coin has ANY possible collector value, or future value, then DON'T CLEAN IT IN ANY WAY!!!


Now, if it is bars you are talking about, or VERY common and circulated 90% silver, then I would say that it is up to you. I would only clean the most tarnished and/or dirty bars or coins, however. I have done it myself, mostly to remove tarnish using TARNEX, which will almost instantly return the silver to a very bright and shiny form. But as a number of people have pointed out, the more blackened and tarnished the piece that is cleaned with TARNEX originally was, the more prone it will be to re-tarnishing, and much faster than it originally did (there are complicated chemical reasons for this, but it is a fact). If you are going to use TARNEX on any silver, I would recommend vacuum-sealing the piece(s) or otherwise sealing it from any exposure to air, as it is sulfurous gases in the atmosphere that make silver tarnish, so cutting off any contact with air will prevent it from happening. Now, it WILL begin to tarnish again once removed from its bag or packaging, but hopefully you will be selling it at that point, and the problem will be in the next owner's hands.

This is why you use the baking soda/aluminum foil reaction.

Mr. Jingles
21st April 2009, 21:32
These guys are correct in the fact that you should not clean most 90% if it has any collector value. I on the other hand only buy it for the silver content. Last winter I needed a new project to work on so I started cleaning some of the hundreds of walker halves that I have aquired over the last few years. It seems to me that they have a better sound to them after you get all the nasty black grime off of them and plus they look very nice. I found that after soaking a bunch of them overnight in a glass jar of amonia a soft toothbrush seems to take the crud off with little effort. I am not much into harsh silver cleaners.

ricm123
21st April 2009, 22:37
Ok, never thought I would ask this. Is it alright to clean your 90% (junk) coins? Would this affect the value at all? (meaning will it decrease the value?) If it's ok, then what would yall recomend?

I have a lot of Junk that has some debris on it, that bothers the hell out of me :)

Thanks in advance

If you're selling them by bulk weight, leave them dirty; they'll weigh more!

theelementofone
22nd April 2009, 07:57
Its mainly halfs that have some gunk on it. Some quarters. So now I am confused. Its all silver content to me, except for the MERCS. and Franklins those are too cool for me to do anything to