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View Full Version : Acoustics of a silver bar vs round.



auptag
20th March 2009, 02:42
Okay, so thought I had the ping test down. I balance and ASE on my finger and give it a little tap and I get the most beautiful *ding* that reverberates for quite a while. It really is a beautiful sound.

Just got some 1 (yes, 1, not 10) oz Silvertowne bars and pulled one out of its plastic out of curiosity and did the ping test. Got a much lower ping that STILL reverberated...but not nearly as long or as "pretty". Reminded me of the sound that they use in movies and cartoons when you see someone pounding rail spikes or digging in a mine. (I've been working in a coal mine goin' down down down, workin' in a coal mine, whoo well I've been swept down....)

Sound about right?

Also, is the ping test valid for 10 ouncers? Got one, but don't want to pull it out of its packaging.

I'm not worried about fakes per se....just wanted to make sure I've been doing this right and that I know the limitations...that way I don't look like a wanker when I try to do the test on a 100oz bar! :eek:

(P.S. It's magnetic too...is that a problem?! :) ;) )

Bullitt
20th March 2009, 03:13
The only things that are magnetic have steel in them.

auptag
20th March 2009, 03:56
The only things that are magnetic have steel in them.

Ha ha....sorry. That part of the post was a joke.

Seriously though....is steel really the only magnetic metal?

Bullitt
20th March 2009, 07:37
Jeeez, after reading your post about selling your stash I thought you were really in the **** with magnetic silver. And yes steel is the only thing a magnet will stick to. Even in stainless its the steel component that is magnetic. Good Luck

Argyria
20th March 2009, 07:45
Jeeez, after reading your post about selling your stash I thought you were really in the **** with magnetic silver. And yes steel is the only thing a magnet will stick to. Even in stainless its the steel component that is magnetic. Good Luck

Not quite correct. I will refer you to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferromagnetic

Bullitt
20th March 2009, 07:55
OK. Genreally speaking only steel is magnetic. A magnetic field can be induced in any metal. Lets not try to split the atom here.

Argyria
20th March 2009, 07:58
No, it cannot be induced in any metal. Unless you refer to dimagnetism. That's when you pass a metal through a magnetic field, and the current induced in it opposes the original field. If you look at that table, cobalt is actually magnetic, for instance. Just like steel. So are some metal alloys.

Gen Ripper
20th March 2009, 09:19
Steel is an alloy.;)

auptag
20th March 2009, 11:38
Glad I could stimulate some lively conversation and learn in the meantime!

silverheartbone
22nd March 2009, 13:48
Indeed Argyria.

This may be surprising to some, but all matter is magnetic (http://www.geo.umn.edu/orgs/irm/hg2m/hg2m_b/hg2m_b.html).

PSUDave
22nd March 2009, 13:58
To answer your original question, all silver 'pings' different, at least to me. My personal favorite is a Morgan dollar. Must be the size and the fact that it's 90%.

Steel is an alloy, the iron in it is what's magnetic. Good higher grade stainless steel is NOT magnetic.

cugir321
22nd March 2009, 21:19
One of these days I'm going to pull out my guitar and determine what note the ding is...

mountainmurph
22nd March 2009, 21:48
Okay, so thought I had the ping test down. I balance and ASE on my finger and give it a little tap and I get the most beautiful *ding* that reverberates for quite a while. It really is a beautiful sound.

Just got some 1 (yes, 1, not 10) oz Silvertowne bars and pulled one out of its plastic out of curiosity and did the ping test. Got a much lower ping that STILL reverberated...but not nearly as long or as "pretty". Reminded me of the sound that they use in movies and cartoons when you see someone pounding rail spikes or digging in a mine. (I've been working in a coal mine goin' down down down, workin' in a coal mine, whoo well I've been swept down....)

Sound about right?

Also, is the ping test valid for 10 ouncers? Got one, but don't want to pull it out of its packaging.

I'm not worried about fakes per se....just wanted to make sure I've been doing this right and that I know the limitations...that way I don't look like a wanker when I try to do the test on a 100oz bar! :eek:

(P.S. It's magnetic too...is that a problem?! :) ;) )



The thicker the silver ,[ bar as opposed to a coin ] the lower the ping will be.

other1z
22nd March 2009, 23:35
Someone said it, but NO two pieces of silver will 'ping' exactly the same. Some may sound similar, but they will never be acoustically equal. Simple mathematics does not allow for two objects such as coins or rounds to be identical - for those without the math degree, think about the example in Jurassic Park, when Chaos Theory is introduced. Small variations in each coin will make the sound emitted from struck coins/rounds different.

As for striking an ASE and a generic round, they are minted differently. I have seen very few rounds, other than government coins that are as thick as ASE's. While the difference is extremely small, the ASE's, Maples and Phils are slightly thicker (I believe) than many of the generic rounds. Don't quote me on this, but I remember being told it at one point [I would hate to deliberately state something wrong again...yeesh]. It certainly makes sense to me, though, as the 'ping' is indeed different. The other thing that could affect the sound is the depth of the denticles. ASE's have what i call a "normal" depth denticle. Many of the generic rounds I have are of the ridged-denticle design - i.e. the "ridges are actually ridges, not denticles, in that they have the 3-sided ridge". This changes the shape of the coin and actually works to slow down the sound wave emitted from the struck coin.

Argyria
27th March 2009, 16:14
Silver's unique acoustics is the reason why high end flutes are made of solid silver. Right off hand I can't think of another instrument that is made of silver for this reason, can anyone else?

JoeSixPack
31st March 2009, 18:04
Magnetic summary: iron, nickel, cobalt and some of their alloys are ferromagnetic below their Curie temperatures. This is the common, easily testable magnetism we are talking about in the "magnet test".

JoeSixPack
31st March 2009, 18:07
...Steel is an alloy, the iron in it is what's magnetic. Good higher grade stainless steel is NOT magnetic.

Austentic stainless steel (i.e., 18-8, 304, 316, etc.) is not magnetic. Some types of stainless steel are magnetic, including some very good ones (like 17-4, 440C, etc.). Martensitic stainless (which good knife blades are often made from) is magnetic. (again, magnetic = ferro magnetic below Curie temperature).