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prahudka
1st March 2009, 22:42
http://www.tbrnews.org/Archives/a2921.htm#001

http://www.coinworldonline.com/counterfeits/default.asp?retURL=articles%2F20081203%2Fcounterfe it_1.asp

http://www.coinworldonline.com/counterfeits/articles/20081203/counterfeit_2.asp

Communist China, as usual, leading the way in simulating plague rats infesting everything good.

Doesnt sound like I could tell the difference.

Can the coin shops tell the difference?

Argyria
1st March 2009, 22:59
They are professionals, they have been at it for 5000 years. Some Chinese milk, anyone? I'll sell it at a discount!

goldminer
2nd March 2009, 02:49
IMO the only coins a person has to worry about are the ones that have numismatic value. This is because counterfieters frequently use gold to make the coin and gold gives it the right weight and dimensions.

A non-numis. value coin's worth is in the metal it contains. Compared with authentic non-numismatic gold coins, fakes will be (1) lighter in weight, (2) larger in diameter, and/or thicker. A key is to be familiar with the form a person intends to buy, and study the coin with a good 10X glass for surface irregularities in the foreground, letters, numbers, and portrait. If a question remains then weigh and measure the coin. If a question still remains, pass on it. To an educated person a fake will often stand out like a sore thumb.

Compared with an authentic non-numismatic silver coin, a fake will be (1) too light in weight, or have too large dimensions; or if silver plated lead, will not ring when lightly struck with an authentic silver coin, or gently dropped on a hard counter/table surface. And again the key is to be familiar with the form being purchased. Study the coin with a good 10X glass for surface irregularities in the foreground, letters, numbers, and portrait. And as necessary weigh it or gently strike it with another silver coin.

A person also needs to know the value of the form(s) s/he intends to purchase. A too-good a deal should immediately raise mental "red flags".

prahudka
2nd March 2009, 09:22
IMO the only coins a person has to worry about are the ones that have numismatic value. This is because counterfieters frequently use gold to make the coin and gold gives it the right weight and dimensions.

A non-numis. value coin's worth is in the metal it contains. Compared with authentic non-numismatic gold coins, fakes will be (1) lighter in weight, (2) larger in diameter, and/or thicker. A key is to be familiar with the form a person intends to buy, and study the coin with a good 10X glass for surface irregularities in the foreground, letters, numbers, and portrait. If a question remains then weigh and measure the coin. If a question still remains, pass on it. To an educated person a fake will often stand out like a sore thumb.

Compared with an authentic non-numismatic silver coin, a fake will be (1) too light in weight, or have too large dimensions; or if silver plated lead, will not ring when lightly struck with an authentic silver coin, or gently dropped on a hard counter/table surface. And again the key is to be familiar with the form being purchased. Study the coin with a good 10X glass for surface irregularities in the foreground, letters, numbers, and portrait. And as necessary weigh it or gently strike it with another silver coin.

A person also needs to know the value of the form(s) s/he intends to purchase. A too-good a deal should immediately raise mental "red flags".

Thanks for your response.

I like my local coin dealer. I would assume that he checks every gld piece. I once got some 40% silver in with the 90% halves -- just a few. He fixed the problem with no big deal -- so he trusted me, which speaks well of him. He is second generation in the business.

What would you do?

I am probably not going to worry about it. Going forward, however, I am not buying from ebay or other than from a reputable dealer.

DuaneLuk
2nd March 2009, 20:37
Just purchased 5 face dollars of silver worn barber quarters. I can smell silver and therse are silver. They are worn to a point that the date on some is gone. I bought these for $53.75 and no shipping. I think I got a good deal but you have to be patient and get in at the right time.

hiyosilver
2nd March 2009, 21:48
Just purchased 5 face dollars of silver worn barber quarters. I can smell silver and therse are silver. They are worn to a point that the date on some is gone. I bought these for $53.75 and no shipping. I think I got a good deal but you have to be patient and get in at the right time.


Now weigh them with a gram scale and subtract 10%, then divide by 31.10348. The result is how many troy ounces of silver you got. Then see if you still think you got a good deal......I'm guessing about 15.25/ozt.....not too bad, but I may not be figuring enough wear. If you plan on using it for barter though, I'd try to stay with more recognizable coinage that's not worn so much. Alot people now have never even seen a barber coin. 90% usually averages around 1% wear, but barber dimes and quarters, and standing liberty quarters, and mercury dimes may have significantly more.