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silverstacker
28th July 2011, 22:39
While I know having any physical at all puts you ahead of most of the world and there is no such thing as having too much, how many ounces do you think the average stacker has? (Physical only, paper doesn't count) At what point can one consider themselves a serious stacker?

PS: I'm looking for what people think the average stacker has, your response doesn't have to be based on your personal stack.

What is Truth?
29th July 2011, 06:36
At these prices anything over 500 ounces is getting serious. But remember, it's not how much you have now but how much you are going to be able to hold on to in the future. Poor hands are weak hands.

bobmhey
29th July 2011, 08:11
Mine varies. Highest was about 150 oz. Now at 12. I buy low and sell high. I think there is a small chance of another run but I also worry about lower prices so I am ready to buy 100 or 120 oz at half price if it comes to that. When I had 150oz I had tubes of eagles and 500 mercury dimes, 62 dollars in other 90%. I ended up lugging it in a cooler when the price got high. Getting robbed of a grand when it was 10 an ounce was one thing but when it was almost 50 an ounce I was happy to sell for profit so I would stop lugging the **** around. One tip. I like to save up for treasury tubes because a full treasury tube is great storage. My 90% I stuffed in an air-sealer. I ended up sucking all the air out like you would for meat. Looked like a funny brick. I had gold and you can sew several thousand dollars into clothes and hang them on the wall and be pretty confident a crook will not find it. But hiding a lot is pretty difficult. Safes are obvious and really just make it hard to carry. Incidentally I bought safes but feel they are too obvious so I fill them with penny rolls. That way they are extremely heavy and if a crook took them they would almost touch my gold with their nose and not see it but steal a shitload of pennies if they steal my safe.

Flymerc
29th July 2011, 10:47
IMO if you count your stack in lbs or kilos instead of oz, then your a "serious stacker".;)

andretti
29th July 2011, 13:11
In my opinion if you don't have at least 3000 oz of silver you have not even begun to stack.

I would say serious stacking "begins" at 10,000 oz.

Yougot
29th July 2011, 13:25
Depends what income bracket your in. Andretti believes that serious comes at $400,000 invested, I believe anything over $25,000 is serious.

Physical, I would say anything over 15 pounds is a respectable stack... That's around a $9,000 investment at current prices.

silverheartbone
29th July 2011, 13:42
I believe AgShaman has give a definitive answer for this question.

You'll have to search his posts.

Chris_
29th July 2011, 13:47
I would say it definitely depends on your income. If you have a stack as large as your yearly salary I would say that means you are approaching a serious stack.

andretti
29th July 2011, 13:59
I agree the size of the stack may relate to your financial situation. However, I disagree that the stack size should ever be measured in Federal Reserve Note equivalent. Your stack doesn't get bigger as FRN's lose value! Your stack is always measured in oz (lbs or Kg).

andretti
29th July 2011, 14:01
Depends what income bracket your in. Andretti believes that serious comes at $400,000 invested, I believe anything over $25,000 is serious.

Physical, I would say anything over 15 pounds is a respectable stack... That's around a $9,000 investment at current prices.

10,000 oz would only be $400,000 invested if you bought at today's price. If on the other hand you had begun to stack say 10 years ago, you might only have $40,000 invested for your 10,000 oz stack.

Quo_Vadis
29th July 2011, 14:45
Keep in mind that if you were to ask most people how much Silver they have in their House, they would probably give you perplexed look. So if somebody has more than 100 ozs of Silver in their House, not only do they know about Silver; but have got it for a reason.

billmr
29th July 2011, 15:16
Keep in mind that if you were to ask most people how much Silver they have in their House, they would probably give you perplexed look. So if somebody has more than 100 ozs of Silver in their House, not only do they know about Silver; but have got it for a reason.

I would too, I have no idea how much the silverware, silver service weighs because I would never melt it.

I thought I did know after the correction to my spreadsheet the other day, but now I have no idea.

thank you

Matthew Shelley
29th July 2011, 15:20
A real close friend of mine who has been trading silver as long as I have says he has a lot of Silver in his house. Not as much as some here are talking about, but he also just bought what seems to be a fairly self sustainable cabin in the middle of nowhere and I'm pretty certain he has it stocked well enough that if everything went to h*ll he'd be in very good shape for a long time.

Brayan Pagan
29th July 2011, 15:39
I own under 500 but believe that it takes 500 ounces of silver to really see profits when the price go up, longterm. Any amount of silver/gold is good for protection but for profitability i think the real numbers are seen at 500+ ounces. Say for instance you bought 100ounces of silver in 2005 at 8.26 and sold today for 45per. You bought at 826 and mader 4500. While that is a good profit, you waited 6 years for it, which sux hehe. Now 500ounces in 2005 is 4100dollars and profitted selling at 45per= 22.5k. That sweet!

silverstacker
29th July 2011, 19:39
I say if your stack is too heavy for you to carry, you're a serious stacker.

Why the carry weight? Well, if you can't carry your stack in SHTF situations, how are you going to move it to safety if needed.

Unfortunately I am not there yet, although I look forward to having such a problem.

silverstacker
29th July 2011, 19:41
At these prices anything over 500 ounces is getting serious. But remember, it's not how much you have now but how much you are going to be able to hold on to in the future. Poor hands are weak hands.

Good point. Its not how much you make, its how much you keep that matters.

silverstacker
29th July 2011, 19:44
IMO if you count your stack in lbs or kilos instead of oz, then your a "serious stacker".;)

lol. I almost framed the question in lbs, but I thought ounces would be easier for this exercise.

silverstacker
29th July 2011, 19:49
In my opinion if you don't have at least 3000 oz of silver you have not even begun to stack.

I would say serious stacking "begins" at 10,000 oz.

While I can agree with your idea that serious stacking "begins" at 10,000 oz, do you really think the "average stacker" is holding more than 3000 oz in physical silver?

SilverSpot
29th July 2011, 19:52
I guess technically it takes two for a stack... in those terms I'm feeling good right now about my stack. I also guess those two for a stack could be measured in kilo's???

silverstacker
29th July 2011, 19:56
I believe AgShaman has give a definitive answer for this question.

You'll have to search his posts.

I would love to know his/her answer. How do I search for their prior posts? Also I have read a lot of your posts in the past and would be curious to know what your answer is.

silverstacker
29th July 2011, 19:59
I would say it definitely depends on your income. If you have a stack as large as your yearly salary I would say that means you are approaching a serious stack.

Even though I was looking for an answer in ounces, I love your response. What a great way to judge your stack relative to your income.

silverstacker
29th July 2011, 20:06
I agree the size of the stack may relate to your financial situation. However, I disagree that the stack size should ever be measured in Federal Reserve Note equivalent. Your stack doesn't get bigger as FRN's lose value! Your stack is always measured in oz (lbs or Kg).

I could not agree more. Although I do like the idea Chris mentioned about measuring your stack relative to your yearly salary (at least for general purposes)

silverstacker
29th July 2011, 20:19
Keep in mind that if you were to ask most people how much Silver they have in their House, they would probably give you perplexed look. So if somebody has more than 100 ozs of Silver in their House, not only do they know about Silver; but have got it for a reason.

I think you are right. I would venture to say the majority of the population has little to no physical in their hands. Owning just 100 ozs puts you way ahead of most.

silverstacker
29th July 2011, 20:25
A real close friend of mine who has been trading silver as long as I have says he has a lot of Silver in his house. Not as much as some here are talking about, but he also just bought what seems to be a fairly self sustainable cabin in the middle of nowhere and I'm pretty certain he has it stocked well enough that if everything went to h*ll he'd be in very good shape for a long time.

I am glad to see you chimed in on this thread. I know you have been in the business a long time so I am curious as to what you think the "average stacker" and "serious stacker" have in physical silver.

valerb
29th July 2011, 20:56
Depends what income bracket your in. Andretti believes that serious comes at $400,000 invested, I believe anything over $25,000 is serious.

Physical, I would say anything over 15 pounds is a respectable stack... That's around a $9,000 investment at current prices.


I'd have to agree with Andretti's $400,000 of Silver value as being a serious investment, not necessarily that you had to invest that much.

That's roughly 10,000 ounces bought a dozen or so years ago for around $45,000. Where a $9,000 investment back they would have net you 2,000 ounces of Silver.

So it's not how much you have invested in Silver, but really when you invested it that makes all the difference.

You really can't compare your your salary or how much you invested, only the value of what you have today. That's the only thing that matters.

silverheartbone
29th July 2011, 21:09
I would love to know his/her answer. How do I search for their prior posts? Also I have read a lot of your posts in the past and would be curious to know what your answer is.
Based on your responses so far, I am sure that you will appreciate his answer.

My opinion of a decent stack is whatever floats your boat. ;)

In my case it would be the equivalent of a thousand silver dollars.
~770 troy ounces in the forms and ratio that I have previously recommended

maestro
29th July 2011, 22:29
10,000 oz would only be $400,000 invested if you bought at today's price. If on the other hand you had begun to stack say 10 years ago, you might only have $40,000 invested for your 10,000 oz stack.

Actually 15 pounds at current market is $7200 15x12x40+7200

~G~
30th July 2011, 01:06
Rule of thumb for survivalist is $1000 face of 90% for every member of your house....So if you have 715 ounces per person in your house you're sitting pretty.

~G~
30th July 2011, 01:08
So if SHTF my kids and wife are on their own because I don't even have 715 yet.

silverheartbone
30th July 2011, 05:30
So if SHTF my kids and wife are on their own because I don't even 715 yet.

I used to, and if I can get back to work, I will again.

Of course know that you keep your mouth shut about your stack.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOo9bjLtL3Q

valerb
30th July 2011, 05:42
People use to recommend six months of income to help you over any rough times. I'm betting one hell of a lot of families found that just didn't cut the muster since 2008.

On the other hand, if you've managed to free yourself from debt, six months of income might never even have been needed, as you may be able to survive on unemployment alone.

Anyone that has been a member of this forum or any of the other PM forums for a number of years, has been warned over and over long before 2008 that it was coming and to unload their debt before it was too late.

Of course they were always warning about TSHTF, but for those that have been tossed out on the street since 2008, TS has HTF.

gregb
30th July 2011, 06:22
How many ounces constitute a decent stack?

Just my opinion, but I would say.
Enough to cover all expenses for a meager lifestyle for one year.
Which would be far more than I have.

valerb
30th July 2011, 07:06
How many ounces constitute a decent stack?

Just my opinion, but I would say.
Enough to cover all expenses for a meager lifestyle for one year.
Which would be far more than I have.

For a lot of people that would be their normal life style, but for others, they would have to give up just about everything to live a meager lifestyle or at least until the bank threw them out of their house.

We shouldn't forget the survivalist out here, who happen to have years worth of food stored in the basement waiting for anything to happen.

You take a car, a house filled with food and no bills and you are talking about some really meager existence time. Taxes, utility bills, beer money and your all set for the duration!!!

Ardent Listener
30th July 2011, 12:46
Just do the best you can with what you got to work with. Too many are always waiting to start stacking and never get started. If you compare your stack with those of others you will always beat some, but not all.

Willie Hunter
30th July 2011, 12:56
I would like to have 1000 oz of silver and 50 oz of gold. Maybe someday I will get there. I think that would be a very good stack.

Matthew Shelley
30th July 2011, 13:23
Actually 15 pounds at current market is $7200 15x12x40+7200

When did they reduce a pound to 12 ounces? I wish someone would keep me up on these things.

Willie Hunter
30th July 2011, 13:46
When did they reduce a pound to 12 ounces? I wish someone would keep me up on these things.

PM's are measured in troy weight, so yes there are 12 troy ounces in a troy pound.

Matthew Shelley
30th July 2011, 13:56
PM's are measured in troy weight, so yes there are 12 troy ounces in a troy pound.

Sorry, I was typing faster than I was thinking.

Willie Hunter
30th July 2011, 14:18
Sorry, I was typing faster than I was thinking.

You seem to do that often.

Matthew Shelley
30th July 2011, 14:38
You seem to do that often.

I'm one of the few people here who admits when I say something stupid.

Ardent Listener
30th July 2011, 15:52
PM's are measured in troy weight, so yes there are 12 troy ounces in a troy pound.

This guy really is a commodities broker and didn't immediately realize that? I don't care if you deal in paper or physical that is basic and he is always lecturing on being informed about the basics.

bobmhey
30th July 2011, 15:58
Considering Americans, myself included, buy cars with extensive car loans like 60 or 72 month loans. I would say if you travel without this cost and have any silver you are light years ahead of the main pack. If you can easily replace your transportation with your stack then it is a nice stack. I always reduce my stack when I have to rather than use it as collateral.

Ardent Listener
30th July 2011, 16:05
Considering Americans, myself included, buy cars with extensive car loans like 60 or 72 month loans. I would say if you travel without this cost and have any silver you are light years ahead of the main pack. If you can easily replace your transportation with your stack then it is a nice stack. I always reduce my stack when I have to rather than use it as collateral.

Buy good reliable transportation, but cut costs by rolling up your own windows and such.

silverheartbone
30th July 2011, 16:09
This guy really is a commodities broker and didn't immediately realize that? I don't care if you deal in paper or physical that is basic and he is always lecturing on being informed about the basics.

I realized his goof immediately, but I consider it a waste of time trying to educate "Shelley", the commodities (as long as it is paper) broker.

Willie Hunter
30th July 2011, 16:36
I'm one of the few people here who admits when I say something stupid.

Really????? I'm not so sure that others here are of the same opinion.

aequitas
30th July 2011, 16:38
First you say 90% silver is illegal to melt, now you "forget" about troy pounds. Next you'll be back to your old tricks of educating us on the "basics"

aequitas
30th July 2011, 16:41
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oznnUbYb01s&NR=1

Guess which one you are.

Flymerc
31st July 2011, 09:45
Considering Americans, myself included, buy cars with extensive car loans like 60 or 72 month loans. I would say if you travel without this cost and have any silver you are light years ahead of the main pack. If you can easily replace your transportation with your stack then it is a nice stack. I always reduce my stack when I have to rather than use it as collateral.

Even if your aware of silver & golds huge financial potential looming and are now taking full advantage, you will forever remain in financial servitude by making poor financial choices.

Au812
31st July 2011, 17:46
Leave the paper junkie be, he was a bit lightheaded due to the loss of blood from that deep paper cut. Get that stitched up yet?

skijake
31st July 2011, 20:34
Actually 15 pounds at current market is $7200 15x12x40+7200


When did they reduce a pound to 12 ounces? I wish someone would keep me up on these things.

Let's keep the questions to something Matt knows inside and out.:D
How much does a ream of 18lb, 20lb or 25lb paper weigh?
What's the difference in weight between a roll of Glossy or Matte?
What color paper weighs the most/the least?
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_oIPVef6_1fw/TIq1tvYOScI/AAAAAAAACME/Xq8QzQXIEIU/s1600/pushing_paper_rolls.jpg

andretti
31st July 2011, 22:16
While I can agree with your idea that serious stacking "begins" at 10,000 oz, do you really think the "average stacker" is holding more than 3000 oz in physical silver?

No! But I don't believe the "average stacker" is much of a stacker at all!

valerb
1st August 2011, 03:46
No! But I don't believe the "average stacker" is much of a stacker at all!

Now that sounds like a bit of truth, especially when you take into consideration all those that buy on E-bay and one or two pieces at a time from the local coin shops. I have do doubt that we have several million who have some kind of stack, rather it's in US coins or actual pure Silver coin or bars. It's easy to see 3,000 times several million does not fit the available Silver model. My sister is a stacker of sorts, two 90% rolls for when TSHTF and that's all she plans on buying.

silverstacker
2nd August 2011, 00:47
Just do the best you can with what you got to work with. Too many are always waiting to start stacking and never get started. If you compare your stack with those of others you will always beat some, but not all.

Wise words.

silverstacker
2nd August 2011, 00:52
Considering Americans, myself included, buy cars with extensive car loans like 60 or 72 month loans. I would say if you travel without this cost and have any silver you are light years ahead of the main pack. If you can easily replace your transportation with your stack then it is a nice stack. I always reduce my stack when I have to rather than use it as collateral.

Car payments are for suckers. If you can't pay cash for your car then you are buying too much car.

silverstacker
2nd August 2011, 00:57
Let's keep the questions to something Matt knows inside and out.:D
How much does a ream of 18lb, 20lb or 25lb paper weigh?
What's the difference in weight between a roll of Glossy or Matte?
What color paper weighs the most/the least?
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_oIPVef6_1fw/TIq1tvYOScI/AAAAAAAACME/Xq8QzQXIEIU/s1600/pushing_paper_rolls.jpg

Now that is funny. Nice One!

valerb
2nd August 2011, 05:17
Car payments are for suckers. If you can't pay cash for your car then you are buying too much car.

Now there's a quote I can agree with, unfortunately most wouldn't even care to try!!

Az2Africa
2nd August 2011, 09:32
Now there's a quote I can agree with, unfortunately most wouldn't even care to try!!

I can't agree more. The last time I had a car payment was 1982 and I paid that one off after six months. I figure 29 years worth of interest on car payments would equal a pretty good stack.

valerb
2nd August 2011, 11:02
I can't agree more. The last time I had a car payment was 1982 and I paid that one off after six months. I figure 29 years worth of interest on car payments would equal a pretty good stack.


I use to hate dealing with care salesmen. The last car we bought, I went high tech and sent E-mails to the sales managers at different dealers telling them what model, color and goodies I was looking for and I wanted a quote. Everyone of them sent back really cheap quotes. No hassles, no bull crap. I just went into the cheapest one and wrote a check, they didn't even own the car, they had to get it from another dealership that afternoon. You gotta love that Internet!!!

Az2Africa
2nd August 2011, 11:32
I work as one of the service managers at a Honda dealership. After watching car deals over many years both before and after I lived in Africa, I can honestly say the the amount of deception between the dealer and buyers is pretty much equal. People say the dealers are crooks and that may be true in a lot of cases, but the amount of lying by customers is at least as prevalent. I get lied to almost daily by customers attempting to get something for nothing. It is getting worse as the economy declines.
But you are right that the internet as made it much better for the average buyer to be more informed and make better choices for the best deal.

silver_surfer
2nd August 2011, 15:34
I would say a 100 to 500 is a nice middle class stack. What's average person got 0 oz? What if you had 500,000 worth? Its all relevent to what you can afford. 10 oz can make a man proud where 1000 oz is peanuts to somone else. Somone will always have more but most people will have less, even if you only have a oz.

yifanzhou
2nd August 2011, 15:58
A true and serious stacker is one who makes all the necessary sacrifices to increase the size of their stack.....regardless of their social/economical status.

So you are true believer of silver's future, then sell your extra car (I did and got 230 oz from it), your extra useless stuff sitting around the house but still worth some $$ value, get a 10% personal loan from best friend, put off buying that LV bag for girlfriend (too late for me), etc etc.

Come on, the end of the tunnel is right upon us after Aug 2. What's beyond the tunnel is everyone's guess. One thing is for damn sure: it ain't gonna be heaven!

valerb
3rd August 2011, 01:51
A true and serious stacker is one who makes all the necessary sacrifices to increase the size of their stack.....regardless of their social/economical status.

So you are true believer of silver's future, then sell your extra car (I did and got 230 oz from it), your extra useless stuff sitting around the house but still worth some $$ value, get a 10% personal loan from best friend, put off buying that LV bag for girlfriend (too late for me), etc etc.

Come on, the end of the tunnel is right upon us after Aug 2. What's beyond the tunnel is everyone's guess. One thing is for damn sure: it ain't gonna be heaven!

I don't know about that concept of sacrificing to increase your stack regardless of your status. I think that very much depends on your status to begin with.

If your on the bottom end of the rung, your sacrificing just to survive, let alone invest in Silver. I think for those people and everyone in general, that stacking some food and some extra cash is far more important than beginning a stack of Silver.

Once you have some food and money to protect yourself and family, then you can start working on a stack of Silver. I just don't see sacrificing everything for the sake of increasing your stack, year in and year out, fearing immanent collapse is just around the corner. Unfortunately, I have been hearing the same doom and gloom stories for over 15 years now. They just keep updating the causes of the our demise and it never happens. I'm not saying it won't happen next week, next month or next year, but it just doesn't seem to ever fully materialize. I can't disagree with the concept of maybe going balls to the wall trying to build as large a stack as possible for a year, but you need some balance in your life and it can't be all about stacking Silver. Keep stacking buy enjoy life as well. If all you can afford it two ounces a month, then buy one and do something with the other $40 that will make your life a little more enjoyable. If you don't enjoy it now, you may not be able to five, ten or fifteen years from now, no matter how much Silver you own. I can tell you that from experience. They say you can't take it with you, but they don't talk about not being able to spend it because your in such poor health that you can't travel either. (not me)

silver_surfer
3rd August 2011, 05:00
If your sill young you have plenty of time to stack. 20 years from now 100 oz will be possibly like 400 ozs or something similiar. At least hopeully this is true!

valerb
3rd August 2011, 09:00
If your sill young you have plenty of time to stack. 20 years from now 100 oz will be possibly like 400 ozs or something similiar. At least hopeully this is true!


Considering Silver is up ten fold in the past ten years and there has never been a moon shot to date, who knows what the next ten years will bring, let alone 20 years.

semartin
3rd August 2011, 09:47
wondering if i should melt all the silverware, platters, bowls, etc., into bars or just stored it? any susgestions ?

wdwexe
3rd August 2011, 09:53
wondering if i should melt all the silverware, platters, bowls, etc., into bars or just stored it? any susgestions ?

It costs $2 per ounce to have it smelted into 10oz stackers in my neighborhood. Good idea unless you have some nice peices.

A serious stack is alot smaller than it was when I started stacking ! I would consider anything 10K + serious.

valerb
3rd August 2011, 10:03
I would say a 100 to 500 is a nice middle class stack. What's average person got 0 oz? What if you had 500,000 worth? Its all relevant to what you can afford. 10 oz can make a man proud where 1000 oz is peanuts to someone else. Someone will always have more but most people will have less, even if you only have a oz.

That 100 to 500 ounce figure is the equivalent to what people bought 10 years ago and might now be thinking that 1,000 to 5,000 ounces is about right, because that's what they have. The same investment amount, but with a whole lot less Silver if purchased today. You get in that mind set of what's right for you and it's hard to take into consideration just how difficult it would be to go out and buy that much Silver today. In my case, I can't help but compare what I paid for my Silver before and find it almost repulsive to think about buying more at today's prices. I know I'll have to in a heart beat if the dollar should take a serious dive. Short of that, I can't see buying anymore myself, but I have what I consider to be a good stack, at least in my mind and for my age. I'm actually more into piling on more food and water and supplies for an extreme emergency where I could end up housing a large number of relatives for an extended period of time. I can't feed them with Silver, but I can if I already have the food! It's amazing just how much food you can buy compared to a single 100 ounce bar of Silver today. I picked up 10 cases of canned ground beef for $720 last month when in Ohio. That's 210 pounds of meat that will store for many years to come and for the price of about what 17 ounces of Silver would cost today. In case you forgot CCJOE, that's extra lean ground beef, not your Yoder's variety.

valerb
3rd August 2011, 11:28
wondering if i should melt all the silverware, platters, bowls, etc., into bars or just stored it? any susgestions ?

I assume your talking sterling Silver and it takes a pretty good beating at the LCS in most cases. Everything always depends on your local LCS and my LCS is such a rip off that I have never even been in his shop. I have to go into the main city and then it still isn't all that much better for me. I'm just curious if your items do not have an actual value that may be worth as much or more than you could get going through an LCS in the future. I remember reading tons of horror stories back in the mid 90's about what happened during the great Silver melt in 79 - 80. Everyone was selling their silverware and taking an unbelievable beating "if" they could sell it at all. That's right, the refiners were so backed up, they were not taking any and many would only take it on the condition that the price they paid the LCS was based on the spot price on the day they actually melted the Silverware they had in storage from the LCS. Kind of an honor system that you had to hope and pray the smelter was being honest. So the LCS were at the mercy of the smelter and the price was running crazy and they were caught in the middle. If anyone thinks they were paying anywhere near the value of that Silverware they are sadly mistaken. I remember one LCS in New York City that supposedly had a deal with a smelter to take all his Silverware on a daily basis and pay him that day's going rate because he was doing such a huge volume of business. He was offering a little more than any other LCS, so he was getting most of the business and had a huge advantage over all the other dealers. They were taking all the risks and he was taking all the profits. As I recall the story, he had something like a half dozen guys working for him. My advice is, do something with your silverware today while the market is stable and use that money to buy pure Silver. If you wait, it maybe to late and you could take a much worse beating than you'll take today. I don't know about sending off to a smelter and having it done as WDWEXE is suggesting, especially for only $2 an ounce. That would be a very good deal in my book, since most mints charge around a dollar an ounce just to convert pure silver bars to rounds. If you can find a smelter that will do it for you for anywhere near $2 an ounce in Canada, I think you should post that information on the forum. I doubt any LCS will offer anywhere near that price.

I don't know if your aware of it or not, but if you have filled handles in your silverware set, the LCS has to smash it to remove the filling from one of each piece to figure out how much Sterling you have in total. So you really have to make sure you are in agreement with the price per ounce before he starts smashing.

I just looked around at some of the dealers I watch and I found one that lists a buy price for Sterling and it was 32.77 an ounce, which if I calculated that correctly, would turn out to be $3.13 an ounce under the spot bid value for the Silver content. So any smelter price under the price an LCS would pay you, would really be to your advantage unless you were just taking the cash and not putting it back into Silver.

Matthew Shelley
3rd August 2011, 12:26
wondering if i should melt all the silverware, platters, bowls, etc., into bars or just stored it? any susgestions ?

Why melt it? No matter if it is in bars or as dinnerware, when it comes time you will be able to get at least the weight in cash. Why not keep them in a useful form that you can use at the dinner table without paying to melt them. They are much more attractive than the stone knives that some here like to talk about. Then when it's time to sell, you will probably get at least a little more than the bullion value.

aequitas
3rd August 2011, 20:26
Why melt it? No matter if it is in bars or as dinnerware, when it comes time you will be able to get at least the weight in cash. Why not keep them in a useful form that you can use at the dinner table without paying to melt them. They are much more attractive than the stone knives that some here like to talk about. Then when it's time to sell, you will probably get at least a little more than the bullion value.

Really?

Dealers and pawn shops pay less for silverware than the refiner would in my experience. Usually in the range of 75-87% of melt unless they are trying to rip you off.

Also, I think valerb has a point that in a panic situation refiners and dealers are going to pay much lower prices for anything that is not .999

JimBo
3rd August 2011, 20:41
How many ounces....? As many as you can carry.

silverstacker
3rd August 2011, 23:36
I can't agree more. The last time I had a car payment was 1982 and I paid that one off after six months. I figure 29 years worth of interest on car payments would equal a pretty good stack.

You figure correctly.

silverstacker
3rd August 2011, 23:39
I use to hate dealing with care salesmen. The last car we bought, I went high tech and sent E-mails to the sales managers at different dealers telling them what model, color and goodies I was looking for and I wanted a quote. Everyone of them sent back really cheap quotes. No hassles, no bull crap. I just went into the cheapest one and wrote a check, they didn't even own the car, they had to get it from another dealership that afternoon. You gotta love that Internet!!!

I like that idea. I might try that next time I buy. Although I hope that will not be for a very long time.

silverstacker
3rd August 2011, 23:42
I would say a 100 to 500 is a nice middle class stack. What's average person got 0 oz? What if you had 500,000 worth? Its all relevent to what you can afford. 10 oz can make a man proud where 1000 oz is peanuts to somone else. Somone will always have more but most people will have less, even if you only have a oz.

More wise words. I agree with every word.

silverstacker
3rd August 2011, 23:54
I don't know about that concept of sacrificing to increase your stack regardless of your status. I think that very much depends on your status to begin with.

If your on the bottom end of the rung, your sacrificing just to survive, let alone invest in Silver. I think for those people and everyone in general, that stacking some food and some extra cash is far more important than beginning a stack of Silver.

Once you have some food and money to protect yourself and family, then you can start working on a stack of Silver. I just don't see sacrificing everything for the sake of increasing your stack, year in and year out, fearing immanent collapse is just around the corner. Unfortunately, I have been hearing the same doom and gloom stories for over 15 years now. They just keep updating the causes of the our demise and it never happens. I'm not saying it won't happen next week, next month or next year, but it just doesn't seem to ever fully materialize. I can't disagree with the concept of maybe going balls to the wall trying to build as large a stack as possible for a year, but you need some balance in your life and it can't be all about stacking Silver. Keep stacking buy enjoy life as well. If all you can afford it two ounces a month, then buy one and do something with the other $40 that will make your life a little more enjoyable. If you don't enjoy it now, you may not be able to five, ten or fifteen years from now, no matter how much Silver you own. I can tell you that from experience. They say you can't take it with you, but they don't talk about not being able to spend it because your in such poor health that you can't travel either. (not me)

Excellent advice! Someone must be passing out the wisdom wine on this thread. I am glad to see it generate so much intellegent thought. I would add one thing to your list and that would be to make sure and have at least a couple of guns for protection just in case. Better to have them and never need them than to need them and never have them.

silverstacker
4th August 2011, 00:01
That 100 to 500 ounce figure is the equivalent to what people bought 10 years ago and might now be thinking that 1,000 to 5,000 ounces is about right, because that's what they have. The same investment amount, but with a whole lot less Silver if purchased today. You get in that mind set of what's right for you and it's hard to take into consideration just how difficult it would be to go out and buy that much Silver today. In my case, I can't help but compare what I paid for my Silver before and find it almost repulsive to think about buying more at today's prices. I know I'll have to in a heart beat if the dollar should take a serious dive. Short of that, I can't see buying anymore myself, but I have what I consider to be a good stack, at least in my mind and for my age. I'm actually more into piling on more food and water and supplies for an extreme emergency where I could end up housing a large number of relatives for an extended period of time. I can't feed them with Silver, but I can if I already have the food! It's amazing just how much food you can buy compared to a single 100 ounce bar of Silver today. I picked up 10 cases of canned ground beef for $720 last month when in Ohio. That's 210 pounds of meat that will store for many years to come and for the price of about what 17 ounces of Silver would cost today. In case you forgot CCJOE, that's extra lean ground beef, not your Yoder's variety.

I have never actually tried canned beef. How does it compare to the normal stuff I would get at the store? Is there a certain brand that is considered the best? Just how many years will it stay good for?

valerb
4th August 2011, 00:20
Excellent advice! Someone must be passing out the wisdom wine on this thread. I am glad to see it generate so much intelligent thought. I would add one thing to your list and that would be to make sure and have at least a couple of guns for protection just in case. Better to have them and never need them than to need them and never have them.

Your right about the guns and I'm loaded for bear, but the list of things is long and I just want to stress food and some cash. A number of our members got caught up in the 2008 mess and had to sell some or all of their Silver because that was all they had.

valerb
4th August 2011, 02:27
I have never actually tried canned beef. How does it compare to the normal stuff I would get at the store? Is there a certain brand that is considered the best? Just how many years will it stay good for?

You can buy it from a number of producers, but you really need to check out the labels for fat content and never, ever buy it made with gravy. When cooked it the can with a gravy, the meat is much tougher.

The only thing they put in the can is raw beef and salt, seal it and cook it. It does have a salty taste to it, but the beef is really tender and there is a slight taste that must come from the can. I have never eaten the beef plain so you can't taste the salt or anything else. To me and a couple others that said they tried the same source and that it tasted just like regular beef to them as well and it should because that's what it is. It's extremely lean beef, something like 6% fat for both beef and ground beef. As far as how long it will last. I don't know. I bought a case before Y2k and about a year ago I decided to check out one of the cans and it was not swollen, so I opened it and it didn't smell bad at all. I warmed it up and added brown gravy and served it over noodles and my wife didn't no it came from a can. So I know it will last for over ten years. Last New Years I bought some more beef and some ground beef to try. The ground beef (Keystone) is so tender and fine, it doesn't even resemble ground beef at all. Unfortunately, since it's already cooked, you can't make Hamburg patties out of it unless you were to turn it into some kind of meatloaf type patty to hold it together with breading, eggs and things like that. As far as sauces, it's great or anything else you would use ground beef in. I decided that I would use a very fine mesh strainer to drain the beef or ground beef before adding it to anything to wash off the extra salt and dilute some of that slight can flavor into other food items. The really great thing about their meat is the lean quality of meat you get for your money. The current price per pound at the case level is $73 for 21 pounds, which turns out to be $3.47 a pound for extra lean ground beef or extra lean beef. Try to buy it at the store for that price when it hasn't even been cooked let along canned for you. If I wasn't so impressed with the quality of their beef products, especially the ground beef I wouldn't have gone back and bought another 210 pounds, which puts me up to something like 315 pounds right now. I was thinking 260, but I had five cases from last winter. This is not simply a survival food store, I'm looking at this as an inflation hedge also against a falling dollar or run away food cost do food shortages. I actually plan on eating a lot of this meat rather anything happen or not. The down side to ordering any canned goods product is the shipping costs involved. I checked their prices and they charge $21 dollars a case for shipping, which adds an extra $1 per pound of beef. Their plant in located in Lima Ohio for anyone who is interested and lives in that area or would consider driving to save a small fortune on a large purchase. I have to drive through Lima on my way to Toledo once or twice a year, so I'm planning on making that a stopping point on each trip. I can only buy so many cases at a time. I can't leave it in my car and there is this casino I can't help but stop at for the night on the way back home so it involves a bellhop, cart, boxes of food, golf clubs, luggage. So I just don't feel right about going in with more than ten cases at a time. By the way, they also have canned chicken, turkey and pork. They all sell for the same price. They also sell these items in smaller cans but the price per pound increase to $3.81 per pound, which is not a lot. The larger cans contain 28 ounces each and the smaller cans contain 14.5 ounces. So for some people, they may only want to cook using the smaller can size and the larger can size might be a waste. Also in a SHTF situation, you would have to eat all of the meat in one setting if you had no electricity, so can size selection can be very important depending on family size. I have multiple solar panels with a bank of batteries and a small refrigerator, so I can keep this from spoiling. More importantly I can keep my beer cold, which is of the utmost importance!!!

You might be able to find a lower price on canned beef, but I urge you to be careful and check out the percentage of fat. These companies are very tricky about how they try and hide their real numbers

Yoders.... Pork --6 grams of fat serving size 56 grams = 10.7% fat...89% lean meat
Keystone Pork 3.5 grams of fat serving size 85 Grams = 4.1% fat....96% lean meat

Notice how keystone has 2.5 grams of fat less per serving, but also notice that keystone also has a serving size that is 51% larger than Yoder's as well. Which meas Yoder's product really has 9 grams of fat for the same serving size as Keystone.

Yoder's Ground Beef 11 grams of fat for a serving size of 56 grams = 19.6% fat..80% lean meat
Keystone Ground Beef 5 grams of fat for a serving size of 85 grams = 5.8% fat....94% lean meat

again Keystones has 6 grams less fat per serving and notice that keystone again has a serving size that is 51% larger than Yoder's, which means that Yoder's product really has 16.6 grams of fat for the same serving size as Keystone.

I have a can of Keystone Chicken which is 98% lean

Turkey is in the same range as chicken.

Here is the web site for keystone for anyone interested: http://www.keystonemeats.com/home/products.php?c=4

Matthew Shelley
4th August 2011, 09:15
Really?
Dealers and pawn shops pay less for silverware than the refiner would in my experience. Usually in the range of 75-87% of melt unless they are trying to rip you off.
Also, I think valerb has a point that in a panic situation refiners and dealers are going to pay much lower prices for anything that is not .999

If you are in danger of panic selling, you bought too much in the first place. If you can't get a good price relative to spot, you are the one who is letting the seller rip you off. As far as anything that is not .999, you get what you pay for. Coins and silverware have fluctuating values above spot depending on the interest in that particular item at that point in time.

pilot2969
4th August 2011, 15:12
I have been stacking since April right before the margin hikes bit into the price, since then I've managed to accumulate a paltry 22 OZT. I try to buy when I can, at least 4 ounces a month. My goal is to have enough to purchase a home when the SHTF scenario happens. I'll be happy once I've locked in 100ozt, and hopefully that'll happen before silver hits $100.00 an ounce.

aequitas
4th August 2011, 19:03
If you are in danger of panic selling, you bought too much in the first place. If you can't get a good price relative to spot, you are the one who is letting the seller rip you off. As far as anything that is not .999, you get what you pay for. Coins and silverware have fluctuating values above spot depending on the interest in that particular item at that point in time.


Did you have a point?

Quo_Vadis
5th August 2011, 06:16
How many ounces constitute a decent stack?


Enough to need a Wheelbarrow to get it out of your House, should it catch Fire.