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Agentum
23rd June 2011, 09:17
Guys, this is looking really ominous:
1. Trichet in Europe says the european economy is blinking red lights
2. They're releasing oil from the strategic reserves and the price is plummetting
3. Commodities are falling together with oil
4. There's a rush into the US dollar because of the problems in europe

This is NOT a positive environment for silver!

silverheartbone
23rd June 2011, 09:30
Guys, this is looking really ominous:
1. Trichet in Europe says the european economy is blinking red lights
2. They're releasing oil from the strategic reserves and the price is plummetting
3. Commodities are falling together with oil
4. There's a rush into the US dollar because of the problems in europe

This is NOT a positive environment for silver!

With the Ashkenazim kabbal in total control of all systems,
this could not be a positive environment for anything that benefits humanity.

crvmiata
23rd June 2011, 09:45
it's good if you are buying.

isaiah58
23rd June 2011, 09:48
What is amusing is the strategic reserves are stored in old salt mines and most of the oil has a high sulfur (sour) content. Yet the oil companies say they can not afford the conversions necessary to crack US oil, thus we have to import sweet oil. The reserves contain "sour" oil because the refineries in fact, as a whole, can handle "sour" oil. ABout 70% of their daily production comes from US sour oil. Doesn't it make sense then for our government to create, and pass, a law that requires the refineries to be able to process US "sour" oil at a capacity to meet all current US needs? Not just 70% of our needs?

FWIW I worked for a while at the Dept of Energy in the Program Office for Strategic Petroleum Reserves.

Flymerc
23rd June 2011, 11:14
it's good if you are buying.


Yes it is!:D

HustliN
23rd June 2011, 11:40
whoa silver dropped a dollar today. looks like USD gain 1-2 points against the CDN dollar

What is Truth?
23rd June 2011, 13:20
Guys, this is looking really ominous:
1. Trichet in Europe says the european economy is blinking red lights
2. They're releasing oil from the strategic reserves and the price is plummetting
3. Commodities are falling together with oil
4. There's a rush into the US dollar because of the problems in europe

This is NOT a positive environment for silver!

It's Europe's turn to take an economic spanking. Next week will it be the dollar's?
Little left in uncle Ben's bag of tricks but to release the oil reserves. Let's hope we are working this time next year.
Yes, all commodities seem to be down today in this goldilocks schizophrenic economy. But how about tomorrow?

This not a positive enviorment for any investment.

Agentum
23rd June 2011, 13:31
It's Europe's turn to take an economic spanking. Next week will it be the dollar's?
Little left in uncle Ben's bag of tricks but to release the oil reserves. Let's hope we are working this time next year.
Yes, all commodities seem to be down today in this goldilocks schizophrenic economy. But how about tomorrow?

This not a positive enviorment for any investment.

By definition, if all other investments, (bonds, commodities, stocks) are going down, then that means the best investment is plain old cash.

If a dollar can buy more stuff tomorrow than it can buy today, then maybe just letting your cash sit in a savings account is the best bet? It's at least as good as the other alternatives, if they're all going down.

What is Truth?
23rd June 2011, 13:38
By definition, if all other investments, (bonds, commodities, stocks) are down, then that means the best investment is plain old cash.

If a dollar can buy more stuff tomorrow than it can buy today, then maybe just letting your cash sit in a savings account is the best bet? It's at least as good as the other alternatives, if they're all going down.

Or at least until we find out how this is going to play out. Some of that "more stuff" the dollar might buy could be silver. Of course nix the savings account idea since they will conficate your money when the banks close. :rolleyes:

Ardent Listener
23rd June 2011, 13:49
This is as good of a time as any to have a cash reserve. I will continue to hold precious metals, but cash too.

SilverSpot
23rd June 2011, 14:49
A few truths I hold that appear to be self evident; death (the time when you never wake from your afternoon nap), taxes (the fuel that propels the machine) and the dollar will buy you less and less as time fly's by!

What is Truth?
23rd June 2011, 15:01
A few truths I hold that appear to be self evident; death (the time when you never wake from your afternoon nap), taxes (the fuel that propels the machine) and the dollar will buy you less and less as time fly's by!

That's true, but silver will buy you a lot less today than it would even from yesterday much less then when it was at $49...........

SilverSpot
23rd June 2011, 15:16
That's true, but silver will buy you a lot less today than it would even from yesterday much less then when it was at $49...........

That appears self evident as well!
I'm not sure there is any investment yet where you can be garuanteed a constant appreciation, unless you are an owner of the federal reserve??
Silvers not looking to hot right now & there are better returns avaliable out there but with the changing world were in here I'm looking for a longterm play.

What is Truth?
23rd June 2011, 15:22
That appears self evident as well!
I'm not sure there is any investment yet where you can be garuanteed a constant appreciation, unless you are an owner of the federal reserve??
Silvers not looking to hot right now & there are better returns avaliable out there but with the changing world were in here I'm looking for a longterm play.

I agree with you on the long term play. But I just wanted all the facts to be known since they might not be as self-evident to everyone.

Prospector
23rd June 2011, 18:08
What is amusing is the strategic reserves are stored in old salt mines and most of the oil has a high sulfur (sour) content. Yet the oil companies say they can not afford the conversions necessary to crack US oil, thus we have to import sweet oil. The reserves contain "sour" oil because the refineries in fact, as a whole, can handle "sour" oil. ABout 70% of their daily production comes from US sour oil. Doesn't it make sense then for our government to create, and pass, a law that requires the refineries to be able to process US "sour" oil at a capacity to meet all current US needs? Not just 70% of our needs?

FWIW I worked for a while at the Dept of Energy in the Program Office for Strategic Petroleum Reserves.

No, we do not need any more d*m laws. We need some people who will take care of responsibilities instead of whining for the government to pass a law to cover every detail of life.

isaiah58
23rd June 2011, 18:56
No, we do not need any more d*m laws. We need some people who will take care of responsibilities instead of whining for the government to pass a law to cover every detail of life.

Since the Gvmnt is already entrenched in the process they might as well do a bit more for "we the people" I would think. What good do all these tax breaks the oil companies get do for us? They make record profits cracking sour crude for 70% of our fuel needs but raising prices based on the sweet crude price. No one buys our sour oil at the same price they pay for sweet oil when we sell it. Go check the data, we sell it for about 85% of the sweet crude price I believe and back to US companies to boot. Then they refine it and sell us our fuel at top dollar. Our fuel price at the pump should be about $2 a gallon based on the amount of oil being produced in the US.

DaleFromCalgary
28th June 2011, 13:41
I'm 40% in cash or cash equivalents, but still 20% physical bullion, 20% physical petroleum, and 20% Canadian bank bonds and preferred shares. My biggest problem is finding anything decent to invest in for the long run. There are no pure-play rare earth investments (mines produce it as a by-product, and the juniors value it as if it were pure separated metals, not mine-run concentrates). Grains are too volatile for long-term investment. The real estate market in Canada is just starting to collapse (visit www.greaterfool.ca for the gory details). I don't want to day trade because I'd rather be hiking in the mountains adjacent to Calgary.