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View Full Version : Free Jars/Lids For Home Canning Food



Sue-Z-Q
28th December 2008, 16:11
qwertyqwerty

sunsetcliff
29th December 2008, 08:55
When I drop off recycling, I grab some store plastic bags. SO I seldom buy the trash bags. Garbage disposal here is 3.50 a bag and going up. I step on it- I crush it. The new neighbor next door, allows me to use her can if there is room. So it is easier to overlook her destructive kids.... to a point.

Some recycling places dont allow it tho.

What I need to do, I get shelves built in my pantry. Food should NEVER be stored on the floor.

I even have a few of those white wire racks... but to install... hmm

My Pants Are Cold
29th December 2008, 11:32
It is REAL frustrating to put a cannerful of stuff into the water, start firing up the burner, and hear that unmistakable slight 'crack!' sound and you know that the bottom just neatly fell out of the jar and when you lift it up with tongs it's going to spew all over into the canner water.

Yes! It is frustrating! I grew a shite load of habanero peppers this past summer. Made a bunch of hot sauce out of it. Used empty, sterilized, Grolsch
bottles for storing some of it(awesome re-sealable bottles). After running out of Grolsch bottles I had a pretty sizable amount of sauce left, so I decided to make it into one large batch. Used a recycled, half gallon+, pickle jar. Everything seemed to be going fine until I heard that "crack". Knew I was screwed. Lost nearly half my sauce in that one 4kup.


One thing I've found to help alleviate this is to use the rack that comes with the canner, put it flat against the bottom, then fold up an old cloth (small terrycloth kitchen towel makes a good buffer/insulator pad) put it down in the water, and put another canner rack on top of that and fill the pressure cooker about 1/3 full of water. You don't want to risk it boiling dry as it does that spit-spit-spit routine escaping steam out the petcock to keep the heat pressurized steam at the appropriate level. I also make a point of heating the whole batch up sllooooooowly.

Put jars of goods in, crank the heat up too fast, and I believe the change in pressure, change in jar between inside/outside temp/pressure has something to do with jar bottoms falling out in a pretty neat circle of glass. (I never have had a jar actually shatter, BTW.) By heating the canner up slowly and bringing it steadily but surely up, which requires more time, seems to go easier on jars and less breakage. So you may want to allow an extra 30 minutes in the process and have the canner on medium and get everything thoroughly and gently heated before you let-'er-rip and kick up the throttle on the burner and get the weight on the pressure cooker jiggling full tilt.

During the cooldown after processing, move it off the burner. Leave the jiggler weight in place. Let it cool down on its own. Don't let the steam out manually to speed things up. I once had a jar crack at that llth hour time and I figured it was a sudden, too-great change in the pressure when I moved the doodad and hot steam spewed to the ceiling.

When you are done and can take the lid off w/o scalding yourself and there's no hissing when you remove the jiggler, then fold up a clean and dry bath towel, put it on the counter and prepare a place for them to cool for 24 hours before storage. Put it in a non-drafty area (not by an open window - I have heard of cool breeze hitting a hot jar fresh from the canner and cracking it). The reason for the towel is to give a buffer between a hard surface and a really hot glass jar. Treat the stuff like it was made of glass - cause it IS. LOL. And glass that's just been through Kitchen Hell So To Speak. Also helps prevent breakage. I space them out enough to cool pretty good, and if I have another canner full coming up, by then the first batch has cooled enough to snug them up tighter to afford more counter space for the second batch and the third.

Let them cool 24 hours before removing the rings and leaving lids in place for storage. After 24 hours you'll know if they're sealed securely or not. Then using a marking pen I write the month/date/year on the lid and also what is inside.

Thanks. Next time, hopefully, I won't waste my precious habanero sauce.

goldminer
29th December 2008, 21:22
"Let them cool 24 hours before removing the rings and leaving lids in place for storage. After 24 hours you'll know if they're sealed securely or not. Then using a marking pen I write the month/date/year on the lid and also what is inside."

This is the time also (when the jars are COOL), after removing the rings, to use a warm damp washcloth to wipe the jars clean. Not infrequently a jar will have been filled just a bit too full which forced some of the liquid beneath the rubber on the underside of the flat, and the rim of the glass jar causing it to run down the side of the jar. Wipe each jar just in case, to clean off any possible foodstuffs before storing 'em.

Sue-Z-Q
29th December 2008, 21:54
qwertyqwerty

Sue-Z-Q
29th December 2008, 21:58
Yes! It is frustrating! I grew a shite load of habanero peppers this past summer. Made a bunch of hot sauce out of it. Used empty, sterilized, Grolsch
bottles for storing some of it(awesome re-sealable bottles). After running out of Grolsch bottles I had a pretty sizable amount of sauce left, so I decided to make it into one large batch. Used a recycled, half gallon+, pickle jar. Everything seemed to be going fine until I heard that "crack". Knew I was screwed. Lost nearly half my sauce in that one 4kup.



Thanks. Next time, hopefully, I won't waste my precious habanero sauce.

qwertyqwerty