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jigster12
22nd August 2007, 23:40
Hello Everyone,

I am in high school and I'm trying to invest in some silver.


First off, I have alot of pre 1965 90% silver coins.. what do you think I should do with them? Sell, Save or what?

Recently I've been buying some small silver bullion as well as some eagles.
Not much..only about 25 ounces worth so far.

I have a decent amount of money just sitting there, so if you do advise me to buy more silver, what type of silver should I look for? (Bigger Bars, Smaller Bars, Eagles?)

What do you think the market will do in the next fifteen years?

I've read so much on the web, but I''m just looking for some personal opinions.

Thank you guys so much...

Miami
23rd August 2007, 09:21
Hello Everyone,

I am in high school and I'm trying to invest in some silver.


First off, I have alot of pre 1965 90% silver coins.. what do you think I should do with them? Sell, Save or what?

Recently I've been buying some small silver bullion as well as some eagles.
Not much..only about 25 ounces worth so far.

I have a decent amount of money just sitting there, so if you do advise me to buy more silver, what type of silver should I look for? (Bigger Bars, Smaller Bars, Eagles?)

What do you think the market will do in the next fifteen years?

I've read so much on the web, but I''m just looking for some personal opinions.

Thank you guys so much...Personally I only buy the cheap silver liberty's for the spot price of silver. The coin dealers only charge like .50 or .75 over spot price. Even if its one ounce per week. Silver's future is very bright if you ask me. And as for what to do with those 90% silver coins... SAVE them! That's what I would do.

goldminer
23rd August 2007, 17:02
My 2-cents plus don't neglect education; get all of it that you can because it will open a lot of doors and greater degree of financial success that will help you generate expendable FRNs that you can trade for metals down the road.
Print this up for your personal use; you have my permission. I hope it helps you.

Developing A Plan & Acquiring Physical Gold and Silver

Important questions to ask:

1. Why am I trading to acquire metals…for what reason(s) do I want them?
2. Am I in for the Long-term or the Short-term?
3. How do I plan to budget my income to create discretionary monies that
I can trade for metals?
4. Which metals do I plan to acquire?
5. Do I plan to hold physical metals, or trade for “paper”/”e” metals, or a
combination of both? If the latter, what percentage of each?
6. What forms of each metal do I want to own?
7. What percentages (in ounces) of each form of metal do I plan to acquire,
and by what ball-park future date do I want to have them in hand?
8. Where do I plan to get my metals?
9. How many Federal Reserve Notes do I plan to make available each week
to trade for metals?
10. Where do I plan to store the physical metals I acquire?
11. Depending on location, what kinds of containers and what methods am I
going to use to securely store my metals?
12. Where do I plan to store my frequently changing written inventory of
metals I hold?
13. What trusted persons will I make privy to where I’ve hidden the inventory,
that also reports the locations of my stored metals?
14. Am I going to maintain and hide one or two copies of my metals
inventory?

The “Rules”:

1. Acquire metals as a store of wealth for current and future security.
2. The only PMs you own are the ones you hold in your hand.
3. “Mums” the word!
4. Don’t think of gold and silver as “commodities” and don’t think of trading
for them in the short-term.
5. Don’t think in terms of “buying” and “selling” metals. Rather, think in
terms of “trading” them “in” and “trading” them “out”.
6. Never chase a runaway stagecoach. It always comes back – sometimes
not all the way, but it will retreat and this is the time to climb onboard.
7. Cost-average all trades over the long haul, and consider acquiring on
downward trends when spot is near or at the 200 DMA (Day Moving
Average).
8. Don’t look at spot prices unless and until you’re ready to trade.
9. If you forget rule #8 it will hurt you.
10. Plan safe and secure storage before you acquire any metals.
11. When planning storage consider the possibilities of fire, metal detectors,
and intrusive government.
12. Store your metals in multiple locations and figuratively forget about them.
13. Keep a precise written inventory of your holdings and where they’re
located.
14. Tell at least two trusted family members about the metals you have, and
where you’ve hidden your inventory.
15. Don’t track the value of your holdings. It doesn’t matter what their
market value is, period. You aren’t going to use your holdings for
collateral and what are you going to trade holdings for anyway, FRNs?
Please!
16. Trade first to get silver, then get gold.
17. Consider avoiding platinum and palladium, and avoid pre-1933 U.S. and
World Gold Coins unless you have numismatic interest, want to collect
them, and know exactly what you’re doing.
18. Cash & carry trading with no name and no paper or e-trail is the best
policy.
19. Diversity is the hallmark of a prudent investor.
20. Bars are neither the most liquid nor the most frequently traded form of
bullion.
21. Consider avoiding 50 and 100-ounce silver bars, avoid all gold bars that
don’t have an assay card, and limit the bars you acquire to only those
produced by Engelhard, Johnson Matthey (JM), Credit Suisse, and Credit
Pamp.
22. Begin by trading to acquire pre-1965 U.S. 90% silver dimes, quarters, and
half-dollars. Optimally first get dimes, then quarters and halves. Consider
working to achieve a ratio of perhaps 50% dimes, 25% quarters, and 25%
halves.
23. While working to obtain the total amount of 90% desired, start acquiring
name brand Englehard, Johnson Matthey (JM), and Sunshine1-ounce
silver rounds and/or bars (depending on preference and premium).
Additional choices might include generic rounds struck by A-Mark, Monex,
U.S. Assay Office, Silvertowne, Pan American, Northwest Territorial Mint,
and others that are frequently seen and thus highly recognizable. Also
acquire 1- ounce U.S. Silver Eagle and/or 1-ounce Canadian Silver Maple
Leaf modern bullion coins.
24. Begin to acquire 10-ounce name-brand silver bars. Choose in order:
Engelhard, Johnson Matthey, Sunshine, A-Mark, U.S. Assay Office, and
Silvertowne.
25. The desired ratio in ounces of 90% silver coins, rounds/bars, and U.S.
Silver Eagles and/or Canadian Silver Maple Leafs, varies among
individuals. Optimally a person should trade to acquire over time, the total
amount of each form and ratio of forms that their plan calls for.
26. When diverse forms of silver are in-hand, begin trading to obtain a mix of
1-ounce and fractional-ounce U.S. Gold Eagles and/or Canadian Gold
Maple Leafs, and think about acquiring South African 1-ounce gold
Kruggerands and fractional ounce British gold Sovereigns that trade at a
small amount over spot.

Private Ownership of Gold and Silver
Copyright 2002, 2004, 2005, and 2006 by Boulder Productions

All rights reserved. This material may not be reproduced in whole or part, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, or otherwise including information storage and retrieval systems, without the express written permission from the publisher.

Kimber
23rd August 2007, 22:03
Goldminer, really excellent information. I am a very new silver trader and really needed some ground rules.

I have only made 3 trades so far.

$39.90 face 90% dimes for $399.50.

5 1 oz rounds for $60.00

4 1921 Morgan 90% Dollars for $50.00.

I "think" I did the best on the 90 % dimes, although Melt Value Calculator says $336.26. I bought when spot was @ $12.50. So I lost right off but I believe I made a good deal based on spot price at that time.

The rounds I paid some above spot but none are from the name brands you mentioned.

The Morgan dollars now seem pretty high since I paid $12.50 ea. and Melt Calculator is $9.01.

I put this bad deal down to my ignorance. I didn't know the weight of silver in a Morgan dollar. I really didn't know it was a Morgan dollar until I looked in up on the Calculator. I did learn a lesson though and it was pretty cheap. The salesman told me the dollar was "just over one oz. “. Oh Well, I learned 2 lessons, don't do business with that salesman and the Morgan dollar is .7735 troy oz.
:p Life’s a joke and we're the punch line.

Once again thanks for the info, it has helped me analyze the trades I have done so far with an eye to improving. I am not the least discouraged. When I went in the store I wanted to get some dollar “face” coins. The Morgan’s were in a bin marked “Common Dollars”. I wasn’t interested in collectables, but I would say these coins are “good” as they show little wear.

I really link the sound silver makes when it “rings”.

goldminer
24th August 2007, 01:30
U.S. silver dollars carry a numismatic premium although there are literally tens and tens of millions of them out there. IMO they have value above the content of silver in that they enjoy legal tender status, are of unquestionable authenticity, very difficult to counterfeit, readily recognized and liquid, and have government guarantee re the content and purity of Ag contained. Like other 90% Ag coins they are in the U.S. and Canada, good items to have in a SHTF environment.

A down-side to alloyed silver like 90% (90% Ag and 10% Cu...gold and silver coins struck for circulation have for the most always been alloyed to make them more durable to withstand the rigors of circulation - gold and silver are too soft to serve as functional items) is that although a lot might contain (say) a $100.00 worth of silver, a refinery incurrs costs in refining the alloy to recover the pure silver. For this reason 90% and other alloyed silver items (i.e. sterling @ 92.5% or .925 fine) will be discounted, meaning the refinery will pay something less than the total melt value of the PM contained.

If you trade to acquire Canadian Ag coins, be careful that you don't pay too much for them. The pre-1967 dimes, quarters, halves, and dollar coins are 80% Ag.

Silver dollars are a good avenue of diversification. Just (as with other forms) cost-average your trades over the long haul. And though a trader in for the long-term doesn't want to think of Au and Ag as commodities, in reality they are, and as such are in forms that a person wants to shop around for, particularly since different items of most forms are pre-owned, they are traded on secondary markets, just like other commodities made available to buyers at flea markets, antique & collectable shows, Good Will, Salvation Army, yard sales, and other places. Sellers vary prices so shop, shop, shop, and then when and where you can get the most metal for your FRNs - make the trade.

Realize though that someone just beginning is kind of "over a barrel" because they want to acquire but yet don't have anywhere near what they ultimately want to hold, so they feel somewhat forced to pay a little more than they otherwise would, because what's important to them is to hold metals...and if they don't get 'em they're not building a stash. Thus the mental key: think in terms of cost-averaging over the long haul. Sometimes you'll pay what you think is a bit too much, and other times you'll find a good "deal" and over a period the cost of all trades made will average out.

Welcome to a facinating world that most people have no idea about because mentally and behaviorally we've been led so far away from gold and silver that we have no awareness of them beyond jewelry, old relic coins, and large bars that we see pictured stored in central bank and government vaults. The irony is that while we are living in a mental (metal) stuper of unawareness, in reality tens of thousands of ounces of Au and Ag are traded every minute of every day all over the world by folks that know the real story: All paper dollars and other instruments exchanged today have no intrisic value. They are worth only what people believe they are worth. We accept dollars in trade for our time and work only because we believe that in turn, we can trade them for goods and services we need.

And government, banking, investment, and other business interests only care about paper dollars and other instruments because it is the movement of these items that generate business profit and tax revenue for government spending. Acquiring an item physical metal and holding it doesn't generate one penny of either business profit or tax revenue. This is why government, banking, investment, and other business interests do not talk about the importance that people acquire and hold some gold & silver. Pick up a money/investment magazine and what you'll see inside is all about trading paper instruments by some name.

The only thing you might see is an advertisement by a dealer conning you saying for bogus reasons that you need to hold some old government struck gold/silver coins...because dealers makes a lot more money selling them then they will ever make selling non-government struck bullion items. Stay away from old gold coins unless you want to collect them and know what you're doing.

Kimber
15th September 2007, 20:39
U.S. silver dollars carry a numismatic premium although there are literally tens and tens of millions of them out there. IMO they have value above the content of silver in that they enjoy legal tender status, are of unquestionable authenticity, very difficult to counterfeit, readily recognized and liquid, and have government guarantee re the content and purity of Ag contained.

Right now my local store is selling ASEs for $16.00. I have purchased some but don't like paying that much over spot. Whats your opinion on that price, does it seem in line?

Also on the "Rules" you posted could you explain the DMA and how or where I can find this. Thanks

goldminer
16th September 2007, 09:26
Firstly if you haven't yet done it, google search "Gold is Money" (GIM) and add the group of forums to your "favorites" list. A person can acquire a wealth of information about many things in hundreds of different threads under such categories as "Gold Silver - Precious Metals", "Purchasing Gold and Silver", "Precious Metals - Gold - Silver - Stocks", "Gold - Silver - coins - Numismatics". There are also other categories you might be interested in.

You can pull up the GIM home page; here's a link to the forum categories archives: http://goldismoneyinfo/forums/archive/index.php/f-1.html
A lot of the following information came from GIM member posts.

Gold and Silver: Trading using a DMA= Daily Moving Average:

A 200 DMA is a moving average of the price in the past 200 days

DMA can be whatever duration you want them to be, but obviously, a shorter time duration DMA shows more of the daily volatility of silver and gold. A 200 DMA filters out much of the daily, weekly, monthly price volatility to show you a picture at that moment, of how gold/silver is performing based on its recent history.

If gold/silver is way above its 200 DMA, then that means it has been outperforming its past 200 day price average significantly. Much of the time when it gets out ahead of itself too far, it will tend to correct down to the 200 DMA, bounce off it, and take another run up. But, if gold/silver break well below its 200 DMA that can be a sign that the secular bull market could be in trouble.

Its really a technical way of describing: "two steps up, one step back, two steps up, one step back, two steps up, one step back". If you can tend to buy on the "one step back" instead of the "two steps up" you can significantly increase your returns over the long run.

The problem with this, as in any technical analysis, is that it is by no means foolproof. It is just a guide.
People who use shorter DMA's are using them to rapidly trade in and out of investments based on very short term volatility.

A simple way to watch the 200 DMA's is to go to Yahoo finance, and look at the gold and silver exchange traded funds (GLD for gold) and SLV for silver. The price of SLV and GLD are not in ounces like the spot prices, their prices though are a proxy for silver and gold, so don't focus on the actual price.

Just type in SLV in the quote box, after the quote comes up, click on Technical Analysis. It will take you to another screen with a 1 yr price chart, you will see an option that will show you 200 DMA, click on it, and you will get a red line along with the graph of the price. The red line is your 200 DMA, and then, it is just a matter of looking at where the blue line is in relation to it. (Another option is to go to kitco.com, and click on Charts and Data, and then Gold under Technical Charts).

In theory, what you want to do is load up when you get down to the 200 DMA, and sit tight when it is significantly above it. The problem with this is that it works in reverse when the secular bull market is over....and, you end up chasing the price all the way down with additional purchases in a secular bear mkt. The other problem is that you could be sitting on the sidelines with your cash because it is way above its 200 DMA, and miss out on a big run up. That is why, at the end of the day, you want to base your investment decisions on the fundamentals surrounding that investment. You should use technical analysis (TA) as a tool to help you add to your investment at the most opportune times.

If your fundamental view changes to negative, then TA can be used to get you out of your investment at the most opportune times. But, given gold and silver's volatility, if my fundamental view changes, I am not using TA to get out, I am running for the door. The best person that I have read that combines good fundamental analysis with good basic TA is Zeal investing.

Watch out for TA because there are all kinds of people who claim that they have some "system" all figured out and that stocks and gold are driven by the chart trends; they are not, they are driven by the fundamentals.

Use TA as a general guide, but don't turn it into a religion.

And re ASE's: In my experience, uncirculated commond date coins usually trade at $1.50-$2.00 over spot. The best thing a person can do who wants ASE's just for silver, is to find some that are scratched, dented from being dropped, or somehow otherwise "marred". These usually trade for about fifty or sixty-cents over spot. Look for them at coin shows mixed in with 1 oz. Ag generic rounds.

JesterJay
14th February 2008, 17:24
Lots of good info on this thread.
Bumping it up so all can see.
JesterJay

jigster12
24th February 2008, 00:06
Yes, thanks alot for all the information.

Now I'm a silver master!

SilverTrees
17th March 2008, 22:04
Jigster......stash all your 90% and stick to collecting them(dimes are my fave) for now, unless you can get deals on other forms. i've found that with 90% you get more bang for your buck, a lot of times you can pay well below melt value.check your local coinshops or even ebay. If you play it right you can get 90% delivered to your door,shipping included,BELOW MELT.90% moves with the spot price of silver so as long as the price of silver doesn't depreciate neither does your investment. in times of crisis it even commands higher premiums. Think about it like this, where else can you get a STANDARD unit of silver smaller than a 90% dime,quarter or even half Dollar? When it comes to selling, maybe you don't want to get rid of a whole ounce. Also,think about hard times and how valuable it would be to have a stash of silver dimes! BUY 90% dimes!!!

TomAlciere
9th April 2008, 15:24
People investing or selling USA silver coins should be aware that, due to wear in circulation, $1000 face value in dimes or quarters yields not 723.38 troy ounces as the coin book would imply, but 715 troy ounces; and halves a little more because they show less wear on average.

7nomads
29th April 2008, 11:53
First of all, if you don't need the money don't sell. Think of silver as future gas money. In 1964 one could buy a gallon of gas for about three dimes. Those same three dimes will buy a gallon of gas today.

Buy the gold/silver ratio at 54 (kitco.com) shows it on their main page.
Sell when the ratio is 47,

http://stockcharts.com/h-sc/ui?s=%24gold%3A%24silver#

Just because you didn't buy silver at $5 an ounce; doesn't mean its too late. That was 5 years ago, who's to say where things will be in five years from today.

Finally, you it as a savings plan, 5% every month is good enough for most.

PS don't listen to your friends like I did in 1978 who told me not to buy gold.

Scrap Metal
30th May 2008, 06:04
As TomAlciere said, older coins have wear and thus, less silver. Buy only coins from the 1960's that show no wear from circulation. Try this, stack 10 old worn Mercury dimes next to 10 1964 Roosevelt dimes. The difference in the height of the stacks is impressive. If you buy old worn coins for the same price as newer coins, you are cheating yourself.

SilverHawk
1st June 2008, 17:52
OK, my intelligent young friend,

If I were you, I'd still be me. The game plan is the same for people with a lot or a little money. Convert dollars to silver. Silver that will be in the most demand and easy to buy or sell.

One Ounce coin.

I would go to the local coin shop and buy as many of the "Common Rounds" as you can. They are the cheapest way to aquire One Ounce Coin. I stay away from the Chineese Panda coins cause there are counterfeits out there. eBay had an article describing how to tell the most obivous counterfeits. Do a google to find that info. I also stay away from the Mexican Onza. Don't trust that country for anything. 98% of the coin you come across in the shop will be American made. If it looks "strange" don't buy it.

When you clean out the shop of the "rounds", then go to the One Ounce bars. Again use your common sense when you buy them. Englehard, Johnson Matthey and Sunshine are well known mints. No "testing" needed.
I've even bought "Merry Christmas" bars and "Happy Birthday" bars.

Most dealers screen the stuff they buy, so when you get to know a dealer real well, you'll be able to trust his judgement.

Now, if you've cleaned out them of the 1oz stuff, go to www.tulving.com to buy American Eagles. I haven't seen anyone beat his prices yet. You can now buy a lot of 300 Eagles, instead of the 500 Green Monster, for a minimum order. Shipping is free. And he'll buy them back for $1.15 per coin when you sell. Cost to you is about .60 per coin plus your cost to ship them back.

As long as you keep the purchase under $10,000 per month, the IRS won't know you have them :)

pkrebaum
20th June 2008, 23:17
Get a coin collector's book and see if any of your 90% coins have numismatic value substantially in excess of their melt value. If you have a few, sell those and buy 999 bullion bars or rounds. This way you convert a speculative value into purely physical value which will appreciate much more as Silver goes up in value.

argentos
16th October 2008, 09:04
http://www.alaska.net/%7Eroyce/spam/spam-collection-2007-06.jpg

akak
21st October 2008, 19:05
Regarding that last post, with the photo:


I hope you have your very own personal defibrillator on hand after eating a steady diet of THAT!


And now for some Spamku:


Waxed my car with Spam
The finish gleams, water beads
hungry dogs chase it.

They have no more SPAM
My hands tremble with anger
Clean-up on aisle 5.

SPAM--Jews won't touch it.
Muslims proclaim it unclean.
Wisdom of the East.

JesterJay
21st October 2008, 23:40
I think they may be on to something here.
Learning my lesson,
JesterJay
Unlike JewsterJay, I will touch Spam.
Me not smart enough to leave it alone.



SPAM--Jews won't touch it.
Muslims proclaim it unclean.
Wisdom of the East.

argentos
21st October 2008, 23:56
I think Spam might taste extraordinarily good to some peeps about three weeks after a major disaster. One tin might be worth almost a sovereign. :cool:

JesterJay
22nd October 2008, 00:08
Note to self.
Buy some:
Spam, spam, spam.
ASPAM!
JesterJay
Strikes again!!!



I think Spam might taste extraordinarily good to some peeps about three weeks after a major disaster. One tin might be worth almost a sovereign. :cool:

hiyosilver
22nd October 2008, 01:05
hmmm, I think I'll buy a pellet gun and shoot birds...:D

Sam Spaiser
15th November 2008, 22:14
My advice would be to buy whatever you can get, but try to make purchases on a scheduled basis, ex. monthly, quarterly, etc. That way you dollar cost average and you are constantly adding to your position. Constantly adding is what helps me sleep at night, knowing where things are headed. So, hold on to what you've got, and keep growing your position. Good Work!

Psalm 12:6
24th November 2008, 15:36
As long as you keep the purchase under $10,000 per month, the IRS won't know you have them :)

I love it!
This is what I tell people all the time and it's the biggest reason why I have started buying PM's.
If they don't know they can't take.:D

cugir321
28th November 2008, 05:25
That is the most beautiful collection of spam I've ever saw. I bet it's worth a fortune. Now start working on your sardine collection. I just opened a tin of sardines and hot peppers last night. Actually not bad, mixes with rice and beans nicely. 2013 expiration on the soy oil ones. My meat last longer then your meat!

I can't believe you've got the 70th year addition spam. That can's worth 465.00

cugir321
28th November 2008, 05:30
I gonna buy birds and teach them to attack people with pellet guns. Steal their gun, sell it and buy more spam.
hmmm, I think I'll buy a pellet gun and shoot birds...:D

(courtesy of the "bird association for a gun free world")

cabtrom
31st December 2008, 07:05
I'm new and just wanted to run a post test to ensure that any real question I ask doesn't end up getting typed and then not posted anyways. But as long as I'm testing. Someone please tell me all my recent acquisitions of Gold and Silver have not been a wast of my money. I bailed on about half my petty cash from the safe and filled it up with what looks like a bunch of shiny paperweights. My wife thinks I'm loosing my mind. Someone reassure me that it will be a great investment.

argentos
31st December 2008, 09:28
It may or may not prove to be a great investment, but unlike shares, bonds, notes, CDCs and other pieces of paper (or digits in a computer) it will always have a value so long as there are a few humanbeans on this earth.

hiyosilver
1st January 2009, 01:21
Ok, I'll put it this way....If you can think of one other material thing that would be a better investment......Let me know!

hdmyg85
4th January 2009, 19:08
Has anyone bought this type of sling shot before that holds the amo in the handle? http://www.liangdianup.com/sporting_1.htm
this company has free shipping to anywhere in the world and they guarantee delivery to Australia. I heard that sling shots
are ok to sell in Australia as long as you say they are being used to toss bait in the water when you go fishing, any truth
to thatone?

sunsetcliff
12th January 2009, 16:18
I'm new and just wanted to run a post test to ensure that any real question I ask doesn't end up getting typed and then not posted anyways. But as long as I'm testing. Someone please tell me all my recent acquisitions of Gold and Silver have not been a wast of my money. I bailed on about half my petty cash from the safe and filled it up with what looks like a bunch of shiny paperweights. My wife thinks I'm loosing my mind. Someone reassure me that it will be a great investment.

Ill trade you that for some ole stock certificates. they are pretty to look at. (but worthless)

faithnotwork
12th January 2009, 16:29
I'm new and just wanted to run a post test to ensure that any real question I ask doesn't end up getting typed and then not posted anyways. But as long as I'm testing. Someone please tell me all my recent acquisitions of Gold and Silver have not been a wast of my money. I bailed on about half my petty cash from the safe and filled it up with what looks like a bunch of shiny paperweights. My wife thinks I'm loosing my mind. Someone reassure me that it will be a great investment.

USD and most stocks will lose money, and if you are in bonds or long term investments, you aren't liquid.. with PMs you can always sell pretty easily to cash out for necessary expenses....

and you aren't alone with the wife unsure of your "new friend".,,

harley1
22nd February 2009, 17:12
My 2-cents plus don't neglect education; get all of it that you can because it will open a lot of doors and greater degree of financial success that will help you generate expendable FRNs that you can trade for metals down the road.
Print this up for your personal use; you have my permission. I hope it helps you.

Developing A Plan & Acquiring Physical Gold and Silver

Important questions to ask:

1. Why am I trading to acquire metals…for what reason(s) do I want them?
2. Am I in for the Long-term or the Short-term?
3. How do I plan to budget my income to create discretionary monies that
I can trade for metals?
4. Which metals do I plan to acquire?
5. Do I plan to hold physical metals, or trade for “paper”/”e” metals, or a
combination of both? If the latter, what percentage of each?
6. What forms of each metal do I want to own?
7. What percentages (in ounces) of each form of metal do I plan to acquire,
and by what ball-park future date do I want to have them in hand?
8. Where do I plan to get my metals?
9. How many Federal Reserve Notes do I plan to make available each week
to trade for metals?
10. Where do I plan to store the physical metals I acquire?
11. Depending on location, what kinds of containers and what methods am I
going to use to securely store my metals?
12. Where do I plan to store my frequently changing written inventory of
metals I hold?
13. What trusted persons will I make privy to where I’ve hidden the inventory,
that also reports the locations of my stored metals?
14. Am I going to maintain and hide one or two copies of my metals
inventory?

The “Rules”:

1. Acquire metals as a store of wealth for current and future security.
2. The only PMs you own are the ones you hold in your hand.
3. “Mums” the word!
4. Don’t think of gold and silver as “commodities” and don’t think of trading
for them in the short-term.
5. Don’t think in terms of “buying” and “selling” metals. Rather, think in
terms of “trading” them “in” and “trading” them “out”.
6. Never chase a runaway stagecoach. It always comes back – sometimes
not all the way, but it will retreat and this is the time to climb onboard.
7. Cost-average all trades over the long haul, and consider acquiring on
downward trends when spot is near or at the 200 DMA (Day Moving
Average).
8. Don’t look at spot prices unless and until you’re ready to trade.
9. If you forget rule #8 it will hurt you.
10. Plan safe and secure storage before you acquire any metals.
11. When planning storage consider the possibilities of fire, metal detectors,
and intrusive government.
12. Store your metals in multiple locations and figuratively forget about them.
13. Keep a precise written inventory of your holdings and where they’re
located.
14. Tell at least two trusted family members about the metals you have, and
where you’ve hidden your inventory.
15. Don’t track the value of your holdings. It doesn’t matter what their
market value is, period. You aren’t going to use your holdings for
collateral and what are you going to trade holdings for anyway, FRNs?
Please!
16. Trade first to get silver, then get gold.
17. Consider avoiding platinum and palladium, and avoid pre-1933 U.S. and
World Gold Coins unless you have numismatic interest, want to collect
them, and know exactly what you’re doing.
18. Cash & carry trading with no name and no paper or e-trail is the best
policy.
19. Diversity is the hallmark of a prudent investor.
20. Bars are neither the most liquid nor the most frequently traded form of
bullion.
21. Consider avoiding 50 and 100-ounce silver bars, avoid all gold bars that
don’t have an assay card, and limit the bars you acquire to only those
produced by Engelhard, Johnson Matthey (JM), Credit Suisse, and Credit
Pamp.
22. Begin by trading to acquire pre-1965 U.S. 90% silver dimes, quarters, and
half-dollars. Optimally first get dimes, then quarters and halves. Consider
working to achieve a ratio of perhaps 50% dimes, 25% quarters, and 25%
halves.
23. While working to obtain the total amount of 90% desired, start acquiring
name brand Englehard, Johnson Matthey (JM), and Sunshine1-ounce
silver rounds and/or bars (depending on preference and premium).
Additional choices might include generic rounds struck by A-Mark, Monex,
U.S. Assay Office, Silvertowne, Pan American, Northwest Territorial Mint,
and others that are frequently seen and thus highly recognizable. Also
acquire 1- ounce U.S. Silver Eagle and/or 1-ounce Canadian Silver Maple
Leaf modern bullion coins.
24. Begin to acquire 10-ounce name-brand silver bars. Choose in order:
Engelhard, Johnson Matthey, Sunshine, A-Mark, U.S. Assay Office, and
Silvertowne.
25. The desired ratio in ounces of 90% silver coins, rounds/bars, and U.S.
Silver Eagles and/or Canadian Silver Maple Leafs, varies among
individuals. Optimally a person should trade to acquire over time, the total
amount of each form and ratio of forms that their plan calls for.
26. When diverse forms of silver are in-hand, begin trading to obtain a mix of
1-ounce and fractional-ounce U.S. Gold Eagles and/or Canadian Gold
Maple Leafs, and think about acquiring South African 1-ounce gold
Kruggerands and fractional ounce British gold Sovereigns that trade at a
small amount over spot.

Private Ownership of Gold and Silver
Copyright 2002, 2004, 2005, and 2006 by Boulder Productions

All rights reserved. This material may not be reproduced in whole or part, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, or otherwise including information storage and retrieval systems, without the express written permission from the publisher.

21. Consider avoiding 50 and 100-ounce silver bars
i am curious why you say this?.makes me a tad uneasy on my first silver purchase of 100 oz JM bars

fullsafe
10th March 2009, 18:57
I imagine it has to do with fakes! 50's and 100's are big enough to get crafty with. Also , if silver exploded to say $50 like many predict, and you decided to sell the bars, the IRS will be notified by any retail dealer after 10k---kiss off a minimum of 28%.

Silver_Guy
12th March 2009, 23:28
Very well thought out responses.

harley1
13th March 2009, 07:38
I imagine it has to do with fakes! 50's and 100's are big enough to get crafty with. Also , if silver exploded to say $50 like many predict, and you decided to sell the bars, the IRS will be notified by any retail dealer after 10k---kiss off a minimum of 28%.
this will not be an issue if i sell one at a time....would love to see 50.00 silver....i will gladly sell mine for for 5000.00-5500.00

bullion_hunter
31st March 2009, 00:42
what is a way to purchase ASE's from outside the US, without using ebay or paypal?

cheers

ccjoe
9th May 2009, 02:46
Tulving, one dealer, does NOT notify anyone or anything when buying or selling.
I agree with all the rules except I think accumulating 1000 oz. bars (strictly to trade) is the way to go> logistically easier.

Cup-of-Ruin
9th May 2009, 05:39
Has anyone bought this type of sling shot before that holds the amo in the handle? http://www.liangdianup.com/sporting_1.htm
this company has free shipping to anywhere in the world and they guarantee delivery to Australia. I heard that sling shots
are ok to sell in Australia as long as you say they are being used to toss bait in the water when you go fishing, any truth
to thatone?

No way would you get a sling shot into Aust. I would be suprised if they would allow in a length of expandable rubber, what if such an item fell into the hands of 'terrorists', just think of the consequences;)

DaBrownsRPhat
12th January 2010, 11:57
21. Consider avoiding 50 and 100-ounce silver bars
i am curious why you say this?.makes me a tad uneasy on my first silver purchase of 100 oz JM bars

I have not and will not buy anything bigger than 10 oz bars or 12 oz coins. I know many more pieces to deal with but that is a good thing because it would be easier to use as money and would be more liquid in any currency or asset I would like to purchase.

The big reason for me though is to cut down the chances of getting ripped off by counterfits.

mark2112gum
12th January 2010, 14:13
what is a way to purchase ASE's from outside the US, without using ebay or paypal?

cheers
Best way is to find a person/friend that you can trust!

galtgulch
12th February 2010, 22:03
You may find dealing with www.APMEX.com to be satisfying. They have an excellent website where you can examine each coin, obverse and reverse before you buy and they guarantee satisfaction with each coin you purchase.

There is a $25 cost to ship for any amount of purchase. You will find that they pack with double cartons to ensure the registered mail by post will hold up well. Others like www.coastcoin.com charge $5 for shipping but the costs per coin are higher than for APMEX.

Everyone seems to be sticking to bullion coins and avoiding numismatic coins. One 1921 Peace dollar in BU condition can cost $325 ! For that price you can get 15 bullion one ounce coins. The question is will the premium go up enough to compensate for the rise in bullion price to make it worthwhile to obtain rarer numismatic coins?

Appreciate any thoughts on the subject.

www.campaignforliberty.com 227,667 members and growing. These people believe that only gold and silver coins are legal tender as called for in Article 1 Section 10 of the U.S.Constitution and are strict constructionists which means virtually all politicians violate the oath they take to preserve the Constitution. Join us and pass the torch. For one thing once we replace the politicians you will not have to worry about confiscation ever again nor inflation nor taxation on your income, capital gains, business or inheritance.

galtgulch

galtgulch
13th February 2010, 05:34
Given your tender age I thought you might be interested in knowing that there is a movement, pro individual freedom movement, which is active and spreading on both college and high school campuses.

The Young Americans for Liberty is endorsed by Ron Paul who founded the Campaign For Liberty and is on at least 170 campuses.

Most of these people share a love for this country and its founding principles of individual freedom and limited government, non interventionist foreign policy and sound money.

Support for the Federal Reserve Transparency Act of 2009 has grown to over 317 House cosponsors (see www.thomas.gov and enter HR 1207 and S 604) There is no authorization for a central bank in the Constitution but Hamilton who was a statist who believed in a powerful central government persuaded President Washington that there was an "implied power" in the necessary and proper clause of Art 1 Sect 8 beyond the enumerated powers.

www.campaignforliberty.com
www.YALiberty.org
www.mises.org
www.fff.org
www.aynrand.org
www.atlassociety.com
www.fee.org
www.cafehayek.com
www.chrismartenson.com

Worth reading Ron Paul's The Revolution: A Manifesto and End The Fed
Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged, The Fountainhead, The Virtue of Selfishness, For The New Intellectual and Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal, Anthem

Join us and pass the torch
galtgulch

Lady
15th April 2010, 15:56
Heavens. I am impressed. Would any of the girls like to hit the shoe emporium?

akak
15th April 2010, 16:24
Heavens. I am impressed. Would any of the girls like to hit the shoe emporium?

You got any cheese to go with that SPAM?

(Oh, that's right --- they don't eat cheese in Shanghai.)

silver"smith"
21st February 2011, 14:56
This is my second official reply in this fantastic forum and I am certainly humbled. For you my young friend, you are in luck because this isn't rocket science. You NEED to get your hands on as much silver as you can, any kind of variety and as quickly as you can afford and MOST important. Don't tell anybody you have it, ever.

anarchir
21st February 2011, 16:02
Given your tender age I thought you might be interested in knowing that there is a movement, pro individual freedom movement, which is active and spreading on both college and high school campuses.

The Young Americans for Liberty is endorsed by Ron Paul who founded the Campaign For Liberty and is on at least 170 campuses.

Most of these people share a love for this country and its founding principles of individual freedom and limited government, non interventionist foreign policy and sound money.

Support for the Federal Reserve Transparency Act of 2009 has grown to over 317 House cosponsors (see www.thomas.gov and enter HR 1207 and S 604) There is no authorization for a central bank in the Constitution but Hamilton who was a statist who believed in a powerful central government persuaded President Washington that there was an "implied power" in the necessary and proper clause of Art 1 Sect 8 beyond the enumerated powers.

www.campaignforliberty.com
www.YALiberty.org
www.mises.org
www.fff.org
www.aynrand.org
www.atlassociety.com
www.fee.org
www.cafehayek.com
www.chrismartenson.com

Worth reading Ron Paul's The Revolution: A Manifesto and End The Fed
Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged, The Fountainhead, The Virtue of Selfishness, For The New Intellectual and Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal, Anthem

Join us and pass the torch
galtgulch

Dont forget FreeTalkLive.com!

poorboy57
11th November 2011, 01:08
any advice form the experts would be appreciated. bought my first few silver coins and the wt/dimensions seem to be off a bit. was considering also getting maybe a couple gold coin as well. with such a big money investment, is it rude to ask the mint or shop if i can weigh/measure the coin before i buy it?

GWealth
15th July 2012, 13:45
I would hold onto your pre 1965 90% silver coins. They are smaller weights which makes them more usable if needed. Collecting smaller silver say, 1 oz bullion and rounds is also good. You can get bigger bars since you will be getting them for a less price per oz in the bars, though a little more challenging to sell later. 15 years is awhile away, and being that far ahead, with the previous trends, silver probably would go much higher.

butcher10
2nd August 2012, 11:53
Probably a dumb question - but I bought a few Canadian Maples that are sealed in plastic MRC pouches like this.

http://media.liveauctiongroup.net/i/8053/9567822_1m.jpg?v=8CCEBDF3EEDBF00

I'd rather stack them in Air-Tite containers, but I don't want to lose any value by removing them from the pouches.
Is there any benefit to leaving them sealed?
Thanks.

Goldbrix
23rd August 2012, 16:18
Less chance of a future potential buy trying to claim they're counterfiet(s).

valerb
11th October 2012, 17:17
can you see my post

Yes your live now.

adelarge
13th November 2012, 12:04
I bought a 10 oz Australian Kookaburra silver bullion coin, year 1992. I measured the tickness of the coin and I found a value less than the indicated value of 8,7 mm. The diameter and the weight seem ok. Moreover the edge of the coin is not all reeded, but only four parts of the edge are reeded, that is the edge is partly reeded and partly smooth. I wonder If the coin is fake or not, could someone help me please? thank you!