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silver_surfer
11th November 2008, 17:25
Just remember you will regret selling your silver if you do!!! The time is coming for silver to be in its most demand ever..solar panels will be as commen as cell phones. Solar energy will become huge sooner then we think.



Silver demand for use in the manufacture of photovoltaic (PV) or solar cells could increase to as much as 1 270 t/y by 2012, Virtual Metals estimates in its latest Silver Book, published in collaboration with Fortis Bank.

Silver is used as the 'metal of choice' for grids placed on the front and back contacts of the silicone-coated cells, thanks to its exceptional conductivity relative to other materials.

Even by the most conservative estimates, the installation of PV cells is expected to grow at a rate of 30% between now and 2010, and at least 20% from 2011 to 2020.

“This industry is going to represent a robust and growing item in the future silver supply/demand balance,” writes analyst Carl Firman.

The European Photovoltaic Industry Association has even gone so far as to predict that, given the right market conditions, solar power could satisfy the electricity needs of 14% of the world's population by 2030.

“This is a very bold claim, but, in view of the current worldwide energy problems and shortages, it is not inherently absurd,” comments Firman.

The growth in installed solar energy capacity to date has largely been driven by Germany, Spain and the US, with Japan expected to re-emerge as it prepares a new set of PV incentives.

The supply side has been dominated by China and Japan, with a 29% and 22% market share, respectively.

VM Group only estimates that the solar energy sector used 432 t of silver in 2007, however, “the future projects look very promising for silver demand in solar energy”.

Assuming an annual decrease in silver loading per watt of 5%, as efficiencies improve, the consultancy expects silver demand from the PV industry to increase to 1 270 t by 2012.

“The conservative outlook of PV growth to 2012 is 13 GW, which brings our estimate for that year down to 1 111t, but the most aggressive industry forecast is 52 GW, which would imply 4 446 t of silver,” Firman adds.

“While we expect reduced silver loadings, due to improved efficiencies and the ramp-up in market share of thin film modules, we also believe that within the next ten years the solar energy sector will be a major consumer of silver, over and above previous forecasts.”

MikeJ
11th November 2008, 18:55
Solar power is a fraud. You know how much power is generated per meter squared with solar? 200 watts!!! Yes, thats 2 100 watt light bulbs, how are you going to power anything?

hiyosilver
11th November 2008, 20:26
The only people still using incandescent bulbs are idiots...

b3nnyboy
11th November 2008, 22:48
Solar power is a fraud. You know how much power is generated per meter squared with solar? 200 watts!!! Yes, thats 2 100 watt light bulbs, how are you going to power anything?

This is an ignorant response. 200 watts will power what 200 watts will power. Then multiply that by how many square meters you have available and you will reach a greater amount..

e.g. A single house can usually spare easily 25m2 of suitable rooftop space, this will produce peak of 5kW, or energy or 10,000kWh (units) per year. An average household (western world) uses less than this amount so the family would receive a power cheque instead of a power bill for the balance of power.

The real issue is decreasing cost of panels - although I am familiar with systems with around 5 year payback (20% return on capital) and plan to be installing systems with a 3-3.5 year payback within the next twelve months. These are not expensive investments, especially when you get a low interest "green" loan sponsored by the govt to fund it or are cashed up to start.

These (PV) systems are guaranteed a minimum output performance for 25 years, (and will continue to perform for years after this) so even current systems will return 5 times $$$ what they cost to purchase of a lifetime even without the future increase in power tariffs.

By the way, the energy need to produce a modern panel is equivalent to the energy the panel will generate from the sun in 8-12 months (dependant on location of installation), so the panels are both financially and energywise a great return on investment.

(Cheap) Energy storage, though, is the holy grail in allowing (current) renewable technologies to replace coal/gas/oil powered generating plant. Current battery technology is just not up to this task.

Solar thermal technology, though, is another beast altogether. Approximately one third the capital cost of PV and can be configured for 24hr a day operation with little extra cost. This will really take off over next couple of years, although I agree with OP the PV market is really gearing up worldwide at the moment.

Trvlr45
11th November 2008, 23:12
The only people still using incandescent bulbs are idiots...

Well, that makes all the people in this country who actually want to see what they are doing idiots. Furthermore, flourescent lights have mercury in them.

I think the real reason they are pushing the flourescents are because tungsten will be in short supply sometime down the road.

It has also been said that there are pssible health concerns with flourescent lighting. As for what those may be I do not know. It gives off a lot of RF and basically, in my opinion, sucks as a lighting source.

LED bulbs are a far better way to go if they want to push something that uses less energy.

They'll be squealing about all the mercury in the landfills once they force everyone to use the inferior product. No matter what anyone does the green weenies will complain until we are living like cavemen and cavewomen again.

Trvlr45
11th November 2008, 23:23
Solar power is a fraud. You know how much power is generated per meter squared with solar? 200 watts!!! Yes, thats 2 100 watt light bulbs, how are you going to power anything?

You're right, Mike. It is a fraud. Just as wind power is a fraud. The technology for both are just not up to the task unless everyone wants the government to tell them where to live and we fill the entire country with solar panels and windmills. Even then it will be unreliable as it already is.

Personally, I think that is what the green weenies want. Everyone living in LA, Chicago or New York City in 600 sq. ft. flats like rabbits in cages. No cars, no freedom, no property rights, no civil rights and no paycheck.

You'll press a button on the wall and green goo will splat onto your environmentally friendly hands as dinner. No plates, forks, knives, spoons or cups allowed. They are bad for the environment.

chux03
11th November 2008, 23:52
Solar power is here to stay, it's not going to disappear anytime soon. The technology has changed much in the past few years. I know there's solar technology available that's not rigid and that you can roll out like rolls of plastic sheeting and secure in place and start generating right away. I find it interesting that the photographic industry's declining use of silver is likely to be replaced and picked up by the demand created by the solar panel industry.

Make no doubt about it....some day in the not-too-distant-future, having a home that has a roof line that enjoys a direct exposure to the full sun all day long is going to be as economically desirable, because of the solar value and opportunities presented in powering, heating and cooling homes, as a premium view or living on waterfront property. And it will be a LOT more common. I wouldn't bet against solar or wind. Not these days...

mick silver
12th November 2008, 00:23
solar power still 5 years away , they have to make it better to hold more power and cheaper , then it will go up as more people start buying , i have been looking for 3 years for solar for my farm

hiyosilver
12th November 2008, 01:39
Read this or search "Nanosolar" on the net yourself:


http://www.popsci.com/popsci/flat/bown/2007/green/item_59.html


(click on the see how it works link)

Mighty Moose
12th November 2008, 01:54
The thing about solar is it's not very practical in regions that are typically overcast.
Has anyone, here, looked into geothermal heating, as an alternative?

Trvlr45
12th November 2008, 03:18
Solar power is here to stay, it's not going to disappear anytime soon. The technology has changed much in the past few years. I know there's solar technology available that's not rigid and that you can roll out like rolls of plastic sheeting and secure in place and start generating right away. I find it interesting that the photographic industry's declining use of silver is likely to be replaced and picked up by the demand created by the solar panel industry.

Make no doubt about it....some day in the not-too-distant-future, having a home that has a roof line that enjoys a direct exposure to the full sun all day long is going to be as economically desirable, because of the solar value and opportunities presented in powering, heating and cooling homes, as a premium view or living on waterfront property. And it will be a LOT more common. I wouldn't bet against solar or wind. Not these days...


You may be right but there are still those little problems called clouds and night time. While we are destroying our economy the rest of the world is drilling offshore and building coal fired power plants. With the banking crisis there couldn't be a worse time to experiment with unproven sources of power.

But then, Americans haven't been known for their common sense in a very long time. I wonder how many people are going to be worried about solar panels when the dollar crashes and we are left holding the bag for trillions in debt. I also can't help but wonder just exactly how many billions we are going to be in debt for after "paying" for all the green weenie wind farms I see sprouting up all over the country.

Trvlr45
12th November 2008, 03:26
solar power still 5 years away , they have to make it better to hold more power and cheaper , then it will go up as more people start buying , i have been looking for 3 years for solar for my farm

You're exactly right, Mick. Solar still is a ways off and while our economy is tanking mainly becuase of the green weenie movement and a corrupt banking system it amazes me how backwards everyone's priorities are.

and(EU)
12th November 2008, 04:08
first of all your economy doesn't tank cause of greenie winie....terrorist....comunists...
you're tanking because of this: http://www.silverbearcafe.com/private/11.08/boomer.html
second: solar power has enormous potential right NOW not within 5 years
if you're using solar for heating the efficency is about 85%, if you're using it for producing electricity then the efficency is about 13% (PV), but the next generation (CPV) has efficency about 25-35%. Sun radiates about 1000W/sq m. Now just calculate how much energy this is. About clouds, night: we're all connected by electrical wires (maybe in Arizona is clear weather, in Oregon is rain - energy goes from Arizona to Oregon).
third: right now is best timing possible to start "third industrial revolution", cause oil is in decline
fourth: by being energy selfsufficient we can't be blackmailed from energy exporting countries (OPEC, Russia)
Nobody said sun will provide us 100% of energy. It's enough right now the percent of renewables is growing. Maybe in 50-100 years we'll be able to produce 100% of energy we'll need with renawables and oil will be used only as industrial commodity for producing plastic, ....
Don't you worry about bankers, they'll be just fine. It would be better 700+ billion dolars would be used for producing new devices that can provide you energy you need.
And there are new jobs also, but unfortunatelly they are that kind you have to work actualy.

argentos
12th November 2008, 05:09
Well, that makes all the people in this country who actually want to see what they are doing idiots. Furthermore, flourescent lights have mercury in them.

I think the real reason they are pushing the flourescents are because tungsten will be in short supply sometime down the road.

It has also been said that there are pssible health concerns with flourescent lighting. As for what those may be I do not know. It gives off a lot of RF and basically, in my opinion, sucks as a lighting source.

LED bulbs are a far better way to go if they want to push something that uses less energy.

They'll be squealing about all the mercury in the landfills once they force everyone to use the inferior product. No matter what anyone does the green weenies will complain until we are living like cavemen and cavewomen again.

If your guvmint is anything like ours, they just haven't got a clue. :(



http://www.theyworkforyou.com/lords/?id=2007-06-14b.1771.47
Lord Forsyth of Drumlean (http://www.theyworkforyou.com/peer/?m=100219) (Conservative) Link to this (http://www.theyworkforyou.com/lords/?gid=2007-06-14b.1771.50) | Hansard source (http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld200607/ldhansrd/text/70614-0002.htm#07061424000071)
My Lords, how can it make sense to destroy an entire industry making mercury barometers, which we have had in this country since the time of Queen Anne (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_Anne), on the grounds that mercury is a toxic substance, when the industry uses a total of 70 pounds of mercury every year and the same institution, the European Union, has voted to ban the use of incandescent light bulbs and to substitute low-energy bulbs, which are already using 4 tonnes of mercury a year and, by the time we have substitution, it will be hundreds of tonnes? That is an outrage. Surely the Government should intervene on behalf of an ancient industry with specialist craftsmen making not just barometers but mercury thermometers and clocks.


Lord Rooker (http://www.theyworkforyou.com/peer/?m=100549) (Minister of State (Sustainable Farming and Food), Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs; Labour) Link to this (http://www.theyworkforyou.com/lords/?gid=2007-06-14b.1771.51) | Hansard source (http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld200607/ldhansrd/text/70614-0002.htm#07061424000072)
My Lords, we did intervene; that is why the derogation is there. The derogation for two years was not there until we requested it. There is no effect on the marketing, importation and trading in antique barometers. The proof of the pudding is simple. There was full consultation on the issue. We did the normal consultation at Defra, which includes hundreds of organisations. None of the barometer manufacturers responded to the consultation. None of them has been in touch with my department, even in recent weeks. There are adequate substitutes for mercury and, as everyone knows, there is a worldwide attempt to remove mercury in all aspects at both EU and United Nations (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations) level.
As for lights, the typical mercury barometer contains between 100 and 600 grams of mercury. That is about 200 to 1,000 times more than a thermometer and 25,000 to 150,000 times more than an energy-saving light bulb. One is not comparing like with like here.

silver_surfer
12th November 2008, 06:09
the future tho will come quicker t en you think. think back in 90s....cell phones..windows95 ...thers a new age coming. I'm 34 there was no cell phones in my high school. computers sucked..my typing isn't greatest , I'm typing from my pda..time to work cya

argentos
12th November 2008, 10:42
the future tho will come quicker t en you think.


Your 90s past was once my future.

mick silver
12th November 2008, 12:12
you say it here , well it not , it could and well be better , the price is too high , to do what i want on my farm is way over 30.000 , that alot of money and it well take years to recover the money for the up front start up , it need to get better an the price need to come down . and to start with i have not seen any solar panels that get 85% of the sun to turn it in to fuel , the numder more like 45%

Mylläri
19th March 2009, 17:27
Solar power is a fraud.

There were probably people thinking the same thing when the wheel was invented. The sun is our most abundant energy source, our ability to harness this great power for conversion into electricity has not been fully realized. Don't knock solar power simply because it hasn't reached its full potential, it has been stymied by cheaper forms of energy like oil. When those cheap resources run out or become to expensive or pollution becomes too great expect to see a mass exodus into revewables, people just haven't woke up.

Bullitt
19th March 2009, 20:28
[quote=Mighty Moose;21718]The thing about solar is it's not very practical in regions that are typically overcast.
Has anyone, here, looked into geothermal heating, as an alternative.

I think Iceland use a lot of geo energy.

akak
19th March 2009, 20:36
[quote=Mighty Moose;21718]The thing about solar is it's not very practical in regions that are typically overcast.
Has anyone, here, looked into geothermal heating, as an alternative.

I think Iceland use a lot of geo energy.


Actually, the last few years there have been amazing developments in solar panels that are MOST efficient in cloudy, overcast and low-angle light environments. Many such panels are already being installed and used in Germany, for example, as roofing on homes and businesses.

One mistake that many detractors make when talking about alternative energy sources is thinking in terms of old-school highly centralized systems --- the 500 megawatt plant that then feeds power out to a broad distribution network. This model need not be the only one, though, and although some centralized facilities will probably always be needed, for backup if nothing else, I think the advantages and abilities of small-scale but widespread sources are repeatedly ignored by those who can only envisage giant and highly centralized power plants on the fossil fuel model.

cugir321
19th March 2009, 20:55
The secret to solar is batteries. You store the power then use it to light a room with a dc to ac inverter for a few hours at night.

I can run a flourescent bulb for many days with a small black and decker jumper/power unit. (A 7 amp hour battery). the bulb uses 15 watts maybe .200 amps. 60 watts of light. That's 4 hours a night for 3-4 days. 60 watts of light is more then they had 150 years ago using candles.

They use this setup on boats and it works fine. A couple 3ft solar panels to charge the battery


Solar power is a fraud. You know how much power is generated per meter squared with solar? 200 watts!!! Yes, thats 2 100 watt light bulbs, how are you going to power anything?

mgbfan
20th March 2009, 12:15
You're exactly right, Mick. Solar still is a ways off and while our economy is tanking mainly becuase of the green weenie movement and a corrupt banking system it amazes me how backwards everyone's priorities are.

Are you for real?

offgrid
20th March 2009, 15:50
Solar power is a fraud. You know how much power is generated per meter squared with solar? 200 watts!!! Yes, thats 2 100 watt light bulbs, how are you going to power anything?

we run our whole house on 600 watts of solar and a 500 watt turbine
and we live in central alberta
we haven't had to charge our batteries with a generator for over a year
when we first moved out here we actually survived on 400 watts of solar alone
but we had to charge the batteries about 7-8 times with a genset

theo68
20th March 2009, 17:07
I don't have problem with solar or wind power. I'm willing to go with what works best. But at the present time these energy sources are nowhere near as cost effective/efficient as fossil fuels. The heavy government subsidies that are planned will ensure that these two power sources remain inferior. What is the point of improving solar and wind when government support already ensures a healthy profit? Also I doubt the government do much to foster competition with in these budding industries.

By comparison, competition with in and occasionally between the oil, natural gas and coal industries has approximately doubled the efficiency with which these energy sources are used over the past 30 years. Only when solar and wind are forced to compete on a level playing field with oil, coal and natural gas, will these new technologies progress to the point where they are practical.

argentos
20th March 2009, 20:40
Only when solar and wind are forced to compete on a level playing field with oil, coal and natural gas, will these new technologies progress to the point where they are practical.



Wise words.

pmstacker
20th March 2009, 20:55
As far as price goes, does anyone remember what it cost in the mid 80s for a pc? The first pc i had cost nearly 2 grand and had a cga monitor and 256k worth of RAM, it had a 5 1/4" floppy drive that held about 1.2mb worth of data. Back then the sales man said this is more power than you will EVER use. About 1 year later it was obsolete. I'm typing on an eeepc laptop that has 2gb of RAM, weighs under 3 lbs and has a 1.6ghz processor running windows xp pro. It has solid state harddrives and is smaller than most books i carried to school growing up. It cost about $349 and that was nearly a year ago. The salesman said i would never need that much processing power, it had an 8086 processor, running at 10mhz. I'm not very old, but technology can really advance in a heartbeat if the demand is there and companies start competing for your dollars. Anyhow back to surfing the web on a pc thats not much bigger than a pda ;)

Ancona
20th March 2009, 21:36
Solar power is a fraud. You know how much power is generated per meter squared with solar? 200 watts!!! Yes, thats 2 100 watt light bulbs, how are you going to power anything?

Ahh.............Young grasshopper, I see you haven't taken the time to research before making such a comment. That is OK' young person, We forgive you this time. Please remember, you are among some sharp tacks here, and the possibility exists for you to get pricked if not paying attention.

That said, Please go to the DSIRE site and explore the available rebates and credits for domestic solar service when installed on either a residential of commercial establishment. Then.....come back and discuss solar power. We recognize the cost of PV installations, and therefore omit the price from our discussions because we find it irrelevant to the discussion. It is not about cost, rather it is about survival.

When properly installed, the average home can be powered by solar panels that cover only 7/10 of the southern face of a rooftop.

valerb
21st March 2009, 04:49
The only people still using incandescent bulbs are idiots...

Up yours Hiyosilver, I still have four of them in my ceiling fan.

valerb
21st March 2009, 05:31
This is one of those times in history when the US didn't start an industry and end up with old obsolete factories.

I have no idea why, but the US solar industry is ramping up outside of Toledo Ohio. My son-in-law has already won the electrical contracts for three different solar companies building new facilities there. I don't remember what the reason was, but he was told they are planning on making it the solar center for the US industry. I left Toledo in 1981 because I couldn't stand it there, I have no idea why anyone would want to start a whole new industry in that part of the country! Maybe it's cheap labor since most of the factories have closed.

It looks like we may actually be making something for ourselves again and it won't be obsolete technology.

PS LED bulbs are still a long way off. I bought one of the largest ones they had and it still didn't put out that much light. It was huge and dim. The one advantage it has over fluorescent, is that it uses even less power per candle-watt. They really have to figure out how to miniaturize those things and pack them closer together.

I have the new micro-mini fluorescent bulbs that are actually smaller than a regular light bulb. Almost as much light as a regular 100 watt bulb and I can now use them everywhere, except in my damn ceiling fan. The older ones either wouldn't fit or they were too large and looked out of place. Now you can buy them with an actual bright white light instead of that old yellow look.

solar_energy
4th April 2009, 00:23
California Solar Energy Industries Association supports the widespread adoption of solar thermal and photovoltaic systems by educating consumers, supporting solar legislation and conducting business in a professional and ethical manner.

CALSEIA is the CALifornia Solar Energy Industries Association.

CALSEIA was founded in 1977. It is governed by a 15-member Board of Directors elected by the membership.

CALSEIA’s mission is to expand the use of all solar technologies in California and establish a sustainable industry for a clean energy future

<A HREF="http://calseia.org" alt="California Solar Energy"><B>California Solar Energy</B></A>

Companies who join CALSEIA are doing business in California or supplying products to California companies. The policies and programs in California affect their livelihoods.

CALSEIA is funded by memberships through annual membership dues

CALSEIA activities

* Enact Legislation: to encourage removal of barriers and policies that help provide an open and competitive market
* Create and/or Modify Regulations: to promote safety, durability, and a competitive market
* Create and/or Maintain Incentives: to build the market to a size that allows the installed cost of solar energy to compete with non-renewable energy resources
* Ethics: to encourage the ethical conduct of companies participating in the solar market. CALSEIA is not a law enforcement organization but it can provide resources to assist people to find the appropriate law enforcement organization.
* Codes and Standards: to ensure safety and reliability and to standardize requirements to reduce costs and improve construction efficiency

Types of Companies that are members of CALSEIA

Manufacturers, Contractors, Distributors, Engineers, Designers, Consultants, Utilities, Educational organizations, Local Governments

Types of solar technologies represented by CALSEIA

* Solar thermal – for water heating, process heat, electric generation, cooling, space condition for residential and commercial applications
* Solar electric (photovoltaic) – for electric generation on homes, businesses, and to the utility
* Concentrating solar – for electric generation, process heat, and cooling
* Solar pool heating – for recreational, athletic, municipal, and therapeutic pools in commercial, residential, and municipal pools

hiyosilver
4th April 2009, 00:42
Up yours Hiyosilver, I still have four of them in my ceiling fan.


Like I said, ...................................... Thanks for proving my point...

Heaven Net
27th June 2009, 11:47
American scientist Peter Glaser introduced the idea of space solar power in 1968. The satellites would electromagnetically beam gigawatts of solar energy back to ground-based receivers, where it would then be converted to electricity and transferred to power grids. And because in high Earth orbit, satellites are unaffected by the earth's shadow virtually 365 days a year, the floating power plants could provide round-the-clock clean, renewable electricity. NASA and the United States Department of Energy studied the concept throughout the 1970s, concluding that although the technology was feasible, the price of putting it all together and sending it to outer space was not.

Skyrocketing oil prices, a heightened awareness of climate change and worries about natural resource depletion have recently prompted a renewed interest in beaming extraterrestrial energy back to Earth. And so has a 2007 report released by the Pentagon's National Security Space Office, encouraging the U.S. government to spearhead the development of space power systems. "A single kilometer-wide band of geosynchronous Earth orbit experiences enough solar flux in one year to nearly equal the amount of energy contained within all known recoverable conventional oil reserves on Earth today," the report said. The study also concluded that solar energy from satellites could provide power for global U.S. military operations and deliver energy to disaster areas and developing nations. Russia, China, the European Union and India, are interested in the concept. And Japan, which has been pouring millions of dollars into space power studies for decades, is working toward testing a small-scale demonstration in the near future.

- This is one of the responses to peak oil becoming a national security concern. The other one is the move toward electrification and running more military equipment on battery power. Put these two together and you will have the beginnings of an electric economy. Like I said earlier, the military is leading the way.

The logistics supply chain bringing up critical supplies including and especially fuel is one of the most vulnerable parts of a wartime operation. Fuel is heavy, bulky, explosive, and prone to attacks by insurgents. One can easily imagine why the military would be very interested in reducing the vulnerability of that supply chain by having power beamed directly to any arbitrary location, no matter how remote, that they would wish to setup shop at.

See also :

1. Pentagon considering study on space-based solar power
2. Beam it down : How the new satellites can power the world

Heaven Net
27th June 2009, 11:51
Quite simply Silver is in a bull market and has not seen any overly enthusiastic investment yet. The price has risen sharply over the past few years, from $5 in 2002 to over $20 today.

The history of Silver shows that it is money as well as Gold. The big difference is that while Silver is money, it is also an industrial metal. Did you know that in over 14 languages the word for “Silver” and “money” are the same? You’ve all heard of the Gold standard but it actually replaced the Silver standard in the 1800’s. Unlike Gold which most of the mined stock is still in existence Silver has been used up and is in relatively short supply.

New uses for Silver are being invented and applied every day. The superior properties of Silver have been apparent in many applications for many years while new technologies are discovering Silver’s superior qualities. Some industrial uses today include:

Batteries:
Both rechargeable and disposable batteries are using Silver today. Silver provides superior power to weight characteristics. By weight Silver makes up 35% of most of these usually small batteries. The Silver produces both higher voltages and a longer life in these types of batteries. Watches, cameras, small electronic devices, power tools, and portable TV cameras are some products which use Silver in their batteries.

Bearings:
Bearings electroplated with Silver provide greater strength and load carrying capacity. Military and heavy duty applications where a no fail system is needed use these bearings. Every time you step on a plane you are holding your life in Silvers hands. Silver coats the bearings in jet engines and provides the lubricity to avoid a catastrophic failure in the event of a lubrication failure.

Brazing and Soldering:
Silver is replacing lead in solders to provide a leak proof and corrosion resistance joint. Air-conditioning, refrigeration, power distribution electrical engineering, automobile and the aerospace industry use Silver brazing and soldering. In plumbing the bactericidal properties of Silver is being touted more every day as a safer way to install plumbing in residential and commercial buildings. In 2006, 47.7 million ounces of silver were used for brazing and soldering.

Catalysts:
Roughly 700 tonnes of Silver are in continuous use throughout the world’s chemical industry. Silver is essential to producing the two compounds the plastics industry needs to produce flexible plastics and hard plastic; ethylene and formaldehyde. Imagine a world without plastics.

Without Silver this US $300 billion industry would not exist!

Silver is the only catalyst that will oxidize ethylene gas into ethylene oxide and worldwide production exceeds 14 million tonnes a year. Being the building block of polyester textiles used in clothing computers, electronics, domestic appliances and Mylar tape (recording tape). Also, 25% of ethylene oxide production goes to produce antifreeze for our cars.

Coins:
In 2006 39.8 million ounces were produced as Silver coins. Silver has been used as money as far back as 550 B.C. and continues to be sued to this day in some countries including Mexico. Since Silver was more plentiful and of less value than Gold it served as a practical means of exchange. Today most of the Silver produced is consumed in one form or another with only 64 million ounces per year set aside for investment purposes. With such a small amount of produced Silver actually making it to market the price of Silver will see some spectacular gains when even a relatively small amount of Silver is sought for investment.

Electrical:
Silver is the best electrical conductor of any known material and it does not corrode. Silver is used in conductors, switches, contacts and fuses. Silver is used in virtually all electrical appliances. Just the US market for electrical switches is roughly 2.7 billion per year

Photography:
Although the digital age is reducing the amount of silver that is used in photographic purposes it will always remain a part of the demand structure because of its low costs and superior definition qualities. In 2006 approximately 145.8 million ounces of Silver were used in photography.
Silver is also used in x-rays. From humans, animals, steam valves, ships, aircraft or truck axels Silver x-rays remain the surest way to find faults in a structure.

Medical Applications:
While only in the last 200 years has Silver been documented as a bactericide Silver has been used throughout the ages in purification applications. Silver vessels were used to keep water, wine milk and vinegar fresh and pure during long voyages. Babies fed with a Silver spoon when young were even proven to have better health than others.
Silver sulfadiazine is used by hospital for burn victims to prevent bacterial infections. Also surgical gowns and other hospital apparel is incorporating a layer of fabric infused with silver particles to prevent microbial transmissions. Research continues to discover new usues for the biocidal properties of Silver.

Jewellery and Silverware:
Silver is the most reflective metal and enjoys a prominent role in jewellery manufacturing worldwide. Although most Silver needs to be strengthened for use in cutlery bowls and other decorative items then called Sterling Silver (92.5% Silver, 7.5% Copper). The demand for Silver in jewellery yearly is 165.8 million ounces and 59.1 million ounces for silverware representing a formidable component of total demand.

Mirrors and Coatings:
Being virtually 100% reflective after polishing Silver is at the forefront of high end mirrors and coatings on glass. When coated on glass Silver will both reflect the suns heat in summer and maintain the heat inside in winter providing substantial cost savings to the user. When used on prescription glasses Silver can reduce UV rays by at least 97%.

Solar Energy:
Silver paste is used in 90% of all crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells which are the most common solar cell. As the use of solar power increases so will the use of Silver. Many buildings now are built with a Silver membrane which acts as a solar cell creating energy and heating or cooling much reducing the utility costs. As this technology is proven over time more and more companies and families will insist on using this type of technology.

Water Purification:
Perhaps the most important use of Silver is that of water purification. Silver works as a bactericide and algaecide. Silver is being used in hospitals homes and remote communities throughout the world in need of clean water. Possibly the most pressing issue of today is clean water and the use of Silver in purifying water may be the solution. Over half of the water purification systems sold in the U.S. every year employs Silver. Silver purifies water of bacteria, chlorine, trihalomethanes, lead, particulates and odour. Silver prevents the build-up of algae and bacteria in the filters. New research shows Silver and oxygen catalyze to produce a powerful sanitizer virtually eliminating the need for the use of chlorine.

It comes down to simple supply and demand fundamentals. The long bear market for Gold and Silver has led to a lack of investment in discovering new silver mines worldwide and now that investment and industrial uses for Silver is skyrocketing the price has no choice but to go up.

The Silver ETF was a huge success and is taking a large amount into their holdings preventing it from being used. Although I am not a fan of the Gold and Silver ETF’s they are serving a purpose of creating great liquidity and demand. As long as the Silver is held by the ETF and not confiscated in any way it will remain a very bullish factor going forward in Silver.

In 2006 the supply and demand of silver matched at 911.8 million ounces. As demand increases for both investment and industrial application this figure will become skewed, needing more supply to meet the demand needs. The only remedy for this will be higher prices.

Exploration for Silver is definitely picking up but it takes from seven to ten years to bring a mine on stream. Exploration was at just $2 Billion worldwide in 2002 and picked up steadily to over $5 Billion in 2005. These figures are just a small portion of the total worldwide exploration budget being spent this year. Many new companies are beginning to explore as they see this as a new frontier with a long and sustainable life.

Recently the physical Silver and paper (futures) prices have begun to diverge. While futures contracts can be manipulated without any actual Silver changing hands the physical market cannot. Demand for Silver as an investment has recently picked up pace and there are stories of lack of physical Silver from dealers throughout the world.

This divergence will continue and retail investment in Silver will become increasingly difficult to obtain. Silver will be well over $100 an ounce and in my view closer to $200 an ounce by the time this bull market nears it’s end. While difficult to obtain now, Silver will provide great returns but my money is in the Junior and Exploration Stocks who explore and mine for Silver either as a by-product or main produce.

I do not believe the world will fall apart and people will go back to the barter system using Silver as a medium of exchange again. If I did I would certainly have most money in the physical metal but I believe a solution will be found to the geopolitical problems we face today. I believe I will make the most money in small stocks.

Bull to date the large producers have done much better than most of the Junior and Exploration Stocks but now is their time to shine. In bull markets the big companies always move first and then it trickles down the pipeline to the smaller ones and as it does the returns increase in magnitude as the companies with small market capitalizations need only a small amount invested in them to move up 100% or even 1,000% in short order.

dextercath96
21st January 2010, 21:30
Solar power have rocket my world.

Ideal for camping or emergency power outages, the
Sun Power Port is a portable generator that when used
to its full potential will pay for itself in less than two years.
In one day of full sunshine, the solar panel easily charges
the 12 volt (standard automobile) battery. An inverter
changes the DC current to AC. From there the electrical energy
is easily accessible to most standard 110 volt small
appliances used in North America. What are the advantages of a solar generator? If you don't know, check out sunpowerport.com. The featured generator will run most small electrical appliances. It is great for camping or emergency backup. No noise. No fumes. For more details see http://www.sunpowerport.com

RDJ
21st January 2010, 23:39
On my trailer I use:
panel: 1 -- http://store.solar-electric.com/kykc65wasomo.html
charge controller: 1 -- http://www.amazon.com/Sunforce-7-Amp-Charge-Controller/dp/B0006JO0XI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1264134344&sr=8-1
4 hours of sunshine will fully charge a single 12V automotive style battery.

Also have 6500 Watts on my house to protect against inflation. It's been three years and the dollar hasn't collapsed, but I still believe.
Note to self: need to get battery back for SHTF.

-RJ.

valerb
22nd January 2010, 04:49
Solar power have rocket my world.

Ideal for camping or emergency power outages, the
Sun Power Port is a portable generator that when used
to its full potential will pay for itself in less than two years.
In one day of full sunshine, the solar panel easily charges
the 12 volt (standard automobile) battery. An inverter
changes the DC current to AC. From there the electrical energy
is easily accessible to most standard 110 volt small
appliances used in North America. What are the advantages of a solar generator? If you don't know, check out sunpowerport.com. The featured generator will run most small electrical appliances. It is great for camping or emergency backup. No noise. No fumes. For more details see http://www.sunpowerport.com

WOW, only $700 for a whole 12AH battery backup system that will power a twenty watt bulb for ten hours. That's basically 200 watts of power. This thing might be able to top off an automobile battery, but it would never charge one in a single day. Besides, you would want a marine battery not an automobile battery for charging and discharging. I haven't looked at solar systems for a couple years, but for $700, you should be able to buy a complete system that charges at least 150 - 200 watts an hour, not in a day!

They claim to be able to pay for itself in less than two years!!!!

At $700, that is a cost of $1 per day in savings or at the average kilowatt cost of 10 cents. This unit would have to produce 10,000 watts of power per day to pay for itself in two years. Since it will only store 200 watts per day in it's tiny battery, that would save 2 cents per day or a total of $14.00 in two years.

If you were to invest in an actual battery, the 28 watt panel could potentially store maybe 300 watts per day on average and increase your return on investment to $21.00 in two years. Even if you could capture and store 200 watts an hour or 2,000 watts per day on average, that would still only save you 20 cents per day or less than $150 in two years.

Now I'm not saying it isn't a good idea to have something in case TSHTF, but this is ridiculous. I bought a cheap system minus the battery on sale for $149 that produces 45 watts an hour. Which could be 180 watts an hour for $600 versus 28 watts for $700.

Colonel Clink
22nd January 2010, 10:47
Up yours Hiyosilver, I still have four of them in my ceiling fan.

Damn straight. What the enviro-nazis overlook is how incandesant bulbs are actually 100% efficient for my purposes. In addition to a pleasing color of light, they throw off heat within my home to keep us cozy. Nothing wasted there! :-)