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Ardent Listener
21st February 2006, 21:39
In your opinion, what is the best way to own physical silver for the smaller investor? How about 90% silver "junk" coins, silver eagles, bullion bars? Other? I lean towards U.S. 90% coins myself, but I do like silver eagles too.

silver100
23rd February 2006, 21:05
I too am unsure. I tend to favor the Silver Eagles, but enjoy the near no premium on 90% junk.

Ardent Listener
23rd February 2006, 21:44
I like to keep a Silver Eagle in my pocket. When I'm tempted to buy something that I really don't need, I pull it out and think to myself; "Would I rather have this or more of these (Silver Eagles)?" :?: The answer is more often than not, the Silver Eagles. :lol:

Silver Bull
18th June 2006, 00:03
What about foreign silver bullion? (Maple Leaves, Pandas, Libertads, etc.) I personally tend to collect bullion cois but invest mainly in bars and rounds. I get rounds at 75 cents over spot whereas Eagles carry a higher premium. Of course I always buy many of the current Eagles until I can get a mintage number. But if the mintage isn't relatively small I figure the premium won't increase as much as the rare dates will. Then if the base price starts to increase rapidly, sans the 2000 Panda which went from 20-25 to 75 in less than 3 months, I will snap them back up again. I just put together a 1999 Silver mint set for about $185 and they are currently going for about 365-385 on Ebay. I run into deals like that all the time. Guess what I do with the profit! More silver for me!

Ardent Listener
18th June 2006, 16:14
Sounds great!

Mr.K
25th June 2006, 18:31
It's nice to have a few bag's of 90% silver coins stashed away along with 10oz bars and Rolls of ASE's.

Ardent Listener
25th June 2006, 19:46
Heck yea, it's all great! :!:

Silver Bull
25th June 2006, 20:32
It's doesn't hurt to have a bit o' British sterling either, mate!

asurfr
4th July 2006, 10:50
personally I like bars 1000 oz. I have over 12000 ounces on hand.. silver will hit 100 an ounce in 4 years

Bill
4th July 2006, 14:18
Personally, I like bars and rounds. I think somewhere in my attic, I may have about 3,000 oz of silver in many different forms. My uncle passed away years ago and was big into the Franklin Mint. It still has to be devided between 5 other family members. But, it's still nice to know I have more on hand.

Ardent Listener
4th July 2006, 17:46
Personally, I like bars and rounds. I think somewhere in my attic, I may have about 3,000 oz of silver in many different forms. My uncle passed away years ago and was big into the Franklin Mint. It still has to be devided between 5 other family members. But, it's still nice to know I have more on hand.

Bill, I have a few Franklin Mint bars, are they sterling?

Bill
4th July 2006, 22:08
I believe that most of the bars from the Franklin Mint were sterling. I was able to locate a small portion of my uncle's old collection. So far I only located a few rounds. But, they were fine silver. I'll keep you posted as I find more.

BC
13th August 2006, 16:48
I've bought the bars, Silver Eagles, coins and rounds and couldn't make my mind up as to which were better for me. I finally figured that the bars might be too big to deal with if I ever needed the silver for money. If silver goes way up in value and the dollar crashes then who is going to give me change for a 100 ounce bar? I narrowed it down to the one ounce silver rounds or Silver eagles.

I like the Silver Eagles but in my case getting in on purchasing silver real late, I figured I had some catching up to do and might as well get as much silver as I could afford for my money. Why spend money on the Eagles if I didn't care about coin value? So I just buy the one ounce Silver Rounds now.

chux03
14th August 2006, 15:48
The eagles are great...except for that premium. Cheapest premium around these parts is at least $1 per coin, usually more...ouch!!! IF I buy SAEs they either have to have free shipping, no sales tax and/or a LOW premium in order for me to buy.
90% US silver from various sources is much closer to melt $, for now at least. And it's kind of nice having a variety of many different US 90% silver, pre 1965 coins available, though for the stash halves and old silver dollars are preferred. Chuck

Whatsamobo
5th September 2006, 13:55
I prefer buying bars and rounds from myself, at least in a way. I have the opportunity to buy my silver from a mint that mints the silver from a mining company in which I own shares of stock. To me it is the most satisfying way of supporting a company in which I own stock. I do the same with other companies where I own stock, like Nabisco (old RJ Renolds), but buying Oreo cookies does not give one the same value appreciation and satisfaction that puchasing physical silver does. The kicker is that the purchase premium is very low on bullion and shipping is free.

Ardent Listener
8th September 2006, 22:02
I prefer buying bars and rounds from myself, at least in a way. I have the opportunity to buy my silver from a mint that mints the silver from a mining company in which I own shares of stock. To me it is the most satisfying way of supporting a company in which I own stock. I do the same with other companies where I own stock, like Nabisco (old RJ Renolds), but buying Oreo cookies does not give one the same value appreciation and satisfaction that puchasing physical silver does. The kicker is that the purchase premium is very low on bullion and shipping is free.

What a sneeky way to spam for Oreo cookies :wink: Where are those moderators? :lol:

Whatsamobo
9th September 2006, 01:14
Ardent,

OK, I am busted. Yes I was hoping to elicit buyers, of the silver company in which I own stock, or their silver or at least inquiries to who the producer was. But you called me out. I have to give you points for style on your call out approach, well done. But still I am pretty proud of myself, although not an approach of genius, I still like the double dipping feeling I get from my plan.

OK monerators, I surrender, I will go peacefully.


D.

Karl K. White
23rd September 2007, 19:19
As a new member to this forum, I apologize for bringing up an old thread. However, it seems this old question is relevant still today, as our common goal as investors in Silver is to make the most of our investments. Hats off to webmaster, goldminer, miami, ardent listener, and anonymous for keeping this forum alive. Now to my point: Since discovering that Canadian Silver Maple Leaf $5.00 coins contain the worlds most pure form of Silver at .9999%, as compared to the U.S Silver Eagle $1.00 coin at .999% purity, I recommend the Canadian Silver Maple Leaf. Discussion?

goldminer
23rd September 2007, 20:15
My 2-cents...

Regardless of what a person favors, diversity is is ALWAYS the hallmark of a prudent investor...be it for monetary gain, security, or a combination of the two. And the reason is simple: nobody including the "experts" really know the future.

Living in the U.S., my preference (if I held any PMs other than the single different 1 oz. silver rounds that I collect), would be diversification in both gold and silver. I would avoid Pt and Pd like the plague.

In silver I would include 90%, some 80 and 40% U.S. & Canadian dimes, quarters, half-dollars and dollar coins, (would pass on the 35%), ASE's, Maple Leafs, Onza's & Libertads, Name brand (including US Assay Office) and prolifically produced and frequently seen Generic 1 oz. Rounds, and 5 & 10 oz. Englehard, JM, Sunshine, A-Mark, US Assay Office, and Silvertowne Bars.

I would avoid the comparatively low-mintage high premium government struck coins, and with gold, I would avoid old U.S. gold coins unless I could get 'em reasonably close to spot.

Also with gold, I would diversify but stay away from all bars except a small percentage of 1 oz. serial numbered Engelhard, JM, Pamp Suisse, and/or Credit Suisse...sealed in their original packaging and their original serial numbered assay card...if I could get them at spot.

In government struck coins I would want to hold 1 and fractional oz. AGE's & Can. M/L's; Mexican Libertads, Onza's, & 50 Peso coins, Sovereigns, and 1 & fractional oz. Kruggerands. I would avoid other world bullion coins unless of a very well recognized and readily accepted type, and cheap.

Karl K. White
23rd September 2007, 20:49
Thank you goldminer. Diversification is always a prudent strategy. My objective over the past year has been to concentrate my investment in the most pure Silver vehicle backed by a solvent government. Just wanted to bring attention to the Canadian Silver Maple Leaf for forum members, as an alternative.

Prospector
29th December 2007, 06:27
There are four markets you need to be aware of, and they are easily confused with each other.

1. Physical metal - The only things that matter are weight, fineness, and refining costs.
2. Collector items - Essentially show business. Value depends on popularity, whether because of appearance or an association with an interesting story.
3. Promises - Any form of a promise to deliver. This includes ETFs, pools, funds, and any method of storage of actual metal or promised metal.
4. Stocks - Supposedly a form of ownership, in practice stocks are valued entirely by popularity. If the company folds, you own nothing. An investment in a stock is not an investment in metal, it is a bet on the success of a specific company.

In the process of getting your head together you first need to figure out which of these markets you want to deal with. If you deal in physical metals you are automatically a long term investor. Short term dealers do poorly in physicals. If you want short term action you should deal in stocks or pools. A set of sterling silverware might be worth more than the silver in it, but don't ever get the idea that a bullion coin has "collector value".

If you want to deal in collector items you should already have considerable experience in collecting. There is no school where you can learn that business. It's easy to tell yourself things like, "SAEs are worth more than spot because people will pay more for them." People who bought with that attitude lost their premiums because many SAEs now sell at spot, even if they are PCGS graded and slabbed. (I have several of those, bought at spot.) Numismatics is a fine business, as long as you know what you are doing. If you don't, don't pay extra for anything.

If you want to deal in promises you should consider that the finance business is famous for broken promises and a lot of very big companies are currently bankrupt because of their fraudulent dealings. I include safe deposit boxes in the category of promises because you are turning your metal over to someone and you need permission to get it back. Any IRS agent can freeze your deposit without showing a court order or any documentation at all - and the banksters will fall over themselves to cooperate. They don't work for you and they know it.

If you want to deal in stocks, consider that your broker might be one of the businesses going bankrupt. You can probably get your stocks transferred to another broker, but it takes a while.

If you want to deal in pools, you are not dealing in metals you are placing bets in a casino. That's ok as long as the casino remains open, the internet continues to work, and they don't restrict withdrawls. A pool can suddenly turn into a suicide pact, which has happened recently.

Be careful. Be very careful. Times are dangerous. There is a lot to be said for having your investment in your own hand, instantly salable, and your only problem is protecting it from the kid next door or your spendthrift spouse.

Irons
2nd February 2008, 20:40
Great advice folks, I'm glad I found this forum.I'm pretty new at this so I stick with 1, 5 and 10 oz bars and rounds.There looks to be a lot one would need to know before they got into coins and a collectors item is only worth something to somebody who thinks like you do.
This looks like it will be a fun and profitable run.:)

JesterJay
6th February 2008, 22:48
Very well said. I like to squish these four markets down into one word assessments.

1. Wealth.
Or Money.
Or Real.
Pick your favorite or add one to the list.

2. Pretty.
Nuff said.

3. Empty.

4. Wishing.

When the physical possession of silver is so relatively easy yet difficult to liquidate a large holding, its security and longevity can't be beat.
I have owned very expensive collector coins: 1882, 1890, 1893 Carson City Morgan dollars were my favorites. I sold them all and bought silver bullion. Glad I did too. The promises are just plain scary and the stocks, well, when you are depending on the performance and behavior of others you are constantly hoping the good run will last, the bad run will end, or the slump will subside.
I'll take mine in the form of anything I can carry home,
JesterJay


From Prospector;1283

There are four markets you need to be aware of, and they are easily confused with each other.

1. Physical metal - The only things that matter are weight, fineness, and refining costs.
2. Collector items - Essentially show business. Value depends on popularity, whether because of appearance or an association with an interesting story.
3. Promises - Any form of a promise to deliver. This includes ETFs, pools, funds, and any method of storage of actual metal or promised metal.
4. Stocks - Supposedly a form of ownership, in practice stocks are valued entirely by popularity. If the company folds, you own nothing. An investment in a stock is not an investment in metal, it is a bet on the success of a specific company.

Irons
8th February 2008, 09:01
You want to talk about scary, I was on ebay looking at a seller who sold a lot of silver eagles, many many of them.Then I looked at what the seller had purchased in the past and WOW!!! Thousands of dollars worth of "US REPLICA" coins directly from beijing china.Thanks but I will stick with A-marks, sunshines, engelhards and others.
If any of you want more info PM me I will be happy to share what I found.

goldminer
10th February 2008, 17:14
Ag Maple Leafs....great point.

It is not infrequently that I see dealers at coin, gun, and antiques & collectables shows who have a lot of 1 oz. rounds with some Maple Leafs mixed in, and price them all at fifty-cents over spot.

Good deal on M/L's!

Chiswick40
13th January 2009, 14:37
In your opinion, what is the best way to own physical silver for the smaller investor? How about 90% silver "junk" coins, silver eagles, bullion bars? Other? I lean towards U.S. 90% coins myself, but I do like silver eagles too.

Some say that in the 70's there was along waiting list to melt 90% junk coins. And that they may be worth way under spot (Mike Maloney) when silver goes supernova....Maloney says that 999 silver is the go....

I would be interested in your comments.

mick silver
13th January 2009, 14:42
i never buy junk silver , 999 alway but that me , i do have some old coins but there mine for saving an looking at an hand down one day

Ardent Listener
13th January 2009, 14:48
Some say that in the 70's there was along waiting list to melt 90% junk coins. And that they may be worth way under spot (Mike Maloney) when silver goes supernova....Maloney says that 999 silver is the go....

I would be interested in your comments.

I can't believe I started this thread! I almost hate threads like this now. lol

If you are a hard core survivalist then you might say that when silver goes supernova it will mean the $hist has hit the fan so you will want 90% to trade for chickens.

On the other hand if you believe that the industrial society we live in will still be here and functioning when silver goes supernova then .999 silver is the way to go. Get rid of it as fast as you can before the price settles down again will be the name of the game. 1980 was a good example of that. The refiners couldn't keep up melting 90% and the fear was that the price would collapse before they could unload it. So they paid less for 90% and sterling (per pure ounce) than .999. People who sold in time still made out well with 90% but not as well as those who had .999.

Chiswick40
13th January 2009, 15:10
I can't believe I started this thread! I almost hate threads like this now. lol

If you are a hard core survivalist then you might say that when silver goes supernova it will mean the $hist has hit the fan so you will want 90% to trade for chickens.

On the other hand if you believe that the industrial society we live in will still be here and functioning when silver goes supernova then .999 silver is the way to go. Get rid of it as fast as you can before the price settles down again will be the name of the game. 1980 was a good example of that. The refiners couldn't keep up melting 90% and the fear was that the price would collapse before they could unload it. So they paid less for 90% and sterling (per pure ounce) than .999. People who sold in time still made out well with 90% but not as well as those who had .999.

You have probably heard this question many times as well.....who will buy when prices go much higher? does that every worry you?...I am relatively new to silver and this question does worry me a little.

Ardent Listener
13th January 2009, 15:18
You have probably heard this question many times as well.....who will buy when prices go much higher? does that every worry you?...I am relatively new to silver and this question does worry me a little.

I sold silver when it peaked $50+) back in 1980. I didn't sell enough silver then, but that's another story..... There were buyers. They even traveled from town to town and advertised in the newspaper. You still see some today. Dealers who sold me silver were buying too. As the price got red hot I found they started to give a lot less of a percentage of spot price. No one wants to get stuck holding a hot potato. But even with all the selling going on at peaking prices I saw individuals come into shops and bought then! Some people were making deals out in the parking lots with each other. The lines were long and they keep buying as long as they had the cash. They must have had a line of credit from the banks or the refiners inorder to fund the buying.

Chiswick40
13th January 2009, 15:39
I sold silver when it peaked $50+) back in 1980. I didn't sell enough silver then, but that's another story..... There were buyers. They even traveled from town to town and advertised in the newspaper. You still see some today. Dealers who sold me silver were buying too. As the price got red hot I found they started to give a lot less of a percentage of spot price. No one wants to get stuck holding a hot potato. But even with all the selling going on at peaking prices I saw individuals come into shops and bought then! Some people were making deals out in the parking lots with each other. The lines were long and they keep buying as long as they had the cash. They must have had a line of credit from the banks or the refiners inorder to fund the buying.

Nothing like a good car park deal I always say lol....thanks.

sunsetcliff
13th January 2009, 15:52
I got an order today... not as heavy as I had guessed. nevertheless better in my hands ...it is still paper gold until it is in possession.

Psalm 12:6
13th January 2009, 15:55
I have All of the above, ASE's, Maples, 1oz, 5oz, 10oz Rounds and bars And my Pandas! I'm hooked on Pandas They are so cuddly!
Also 90% $.50, quarters, and a whole lot of dimes
I'm currently waiting on my 2009 Pandas from NWTM ordered on 12/23
I've noticed with the Pandas, if there is a short run that the prices after a couple of years go through the roof.
And with the run on silver I'm gambling on Pandas this year that they will be a very short run.
I believe that I will order more Pandas this Friday but it will be a tough decision since I have found ASE's for under $15.00 ea.

I've noticed on eBay that the 1oz. seem to bring more money, like before when I saw the 1oz. Buff bars go for $22.00 ea. and at the same time 10oz. bars were at about $18.00 an oz. So with bullion I'm going to purchase 1oz.

I am glad I didn't purchase any silver last week with the little spike we had.
Come on prices go down for my payday purchase this Friday!!!

sunsetcliff
13th January 2009, 15:57
...on ebay sellers can charge more because delivery is sooner. there is a certain comfort in that.

Mylläri
13th January 2009, 16:11
I posted this in another thread, this is the way I've been going about things for a while and I don't intend to change the good thing I have going.


As of right now, I only own Silver American Eagles, Silver Canadian Maple Leafs, One Silver Vienna Philharmonic (just to have one although I'm not interested in buying any more), 40% & 90% U.S. coins.

Frankly I'm only interested in buying SAE, SML, 40% & 90% coins as far as silver goes. I may get around to purchasing some 10oz bars sometime, but I'd really like to just stick to what I know best. As far as gold goes I only buy U.S. or Canadian mint coins. And I also like putting away any pre-1982 pennies I come across.

All around I think the absolute best thing to invest in of all PM are the Silver American Eagle bullion coins. I have yet to come across any disadvantage in owning these as compared to any other form of silver.

orange20
13th January 2009, 19:29
You want to talk about scary, I was on ebay looking at a seller who sold a lot of silver eagles, many many of them.Then I looked at what the seller had purchased in the past and WOW!!! Thousands of dollars worth of "US REPLICA" coins directly from beijing china.Thanks but I will stick with A-marks, sunshines, engelhards and others.
If any of you want more info PM me I will be happy to share what I found.


What? I bought a lot of SAE's there, and I just got my livecashback money back recently. They wouldn't be fake if they ping would they? I pm'ed you.

Irons
15th January 2009, 18:07
What? I bought a lot of SAE's there, and I just got my livecashback money back recently. They wouldn't be fake if they ping would they? I pm'ed you.
This thread is a year old, Your eagles are more than likely fine unless they were shipped from overseas.
When you buy from ebay you have the opportunity to look at the sellers recent purchases before you buy. That was the warning I posted way back when. If the seller I was referring to is still out there I'm not trying to look them up any more.

podrag
16th January 2009, 10:36
Spot + 89c at Tulving.

They carry the seal of the United States Government, they are difficult to counterfeit, they come in small denominations - making them ideal for barter - and most of all they are CHEAP relative to other forms of physical silver.

adoracle
16th January 2009, 16:10
I think coins are great for now...but if the SHTF as so many believe it will, the collectble aspects will not stick, that part will lose its value fast. Under global or even local necessity stresses the only people who will care about what kind of coin you have for trade are those who already have more than enough wealth when things come apart. past that, purity is critical, silver is excellent, even shot, as it can be weighed out in smaller increments, easily judged for purity by either float, displacement of melt temps etc. Coins, in terms of times wherein people are desperate and using silver barter for money in the face of a collapsed fiat, will be virtually worthless at 90% and I believe huge losses will be immediate because that collectible that makes it so sought after now, will have lost its appeal. Paying $40.00 for a coin with a $1.00 face value proves all value there is within the demand of collectors...collectors will be few and far between in an absence of fiat or choice.

Given that fiat is going to fail, already has actually, we've just yet to feel the dispersion of the energy make its way all the way tothe end of the whip...ever played "snap the whip"? ever been the last person on that whip? Those often don't make it without being thrown off into the wilderness at high velocities...lol

This nation, along with the rest of the world is being, IMHO, played like a trout is played with by fly-fishermen...dropping out of the sky, all kinds of shiny things complete with established wisdom and history of values and the promise of laying back fat are just more than we can resist going for...but values w/regard to how collectible something is disappears when the cost to feed your baby another day is a gram of .999...

The reality is, specifically in the face of SHTF circumstances, you'd better go for the defacto value, not even considering anything who's primary value is how "collectible" it is. You'd be better off with silver shot that is soft, can be pounded into coinage used with scales to accuracy etc than even a gold clad/filled USMINT coin once all the rage.

BEcause mark these words: When a loaf of bread will buy a new motorcyle or a #10 can of viable non GM veggie seeds will buy a median 3/2 home, that value born of collectibility won't mean squat. As long as we have an oligarchic society, coinage will hold its value because they'll always be capable of manipulating the value to suit moving said virtual trash [90% purish) out of their coffers into yours in exchange for your fiat [while it lasts]which they then promptly turn into pure silver bullion/gold/palladium etc...which, along with foodstuffs and water resources, is in these final days, the ONLY real wealth on all the earth....God's money established its value immediately and has held it throughout the history of humanity, and it continues to do so. will always do so. Only when bread is rarer than God's money will it begin to lose its inherent God given value. I personally doubt we have that much time left in this particular incarnation for anything to "recover" permanently in any way immediately recognizable to your average human being.

faithnotwork
17th January 2009, 21:50
In your opinion, what is the best way to own physical silver for the smaller investor? How about 90% silver "junk" coins, silver eagles, bullion bars? Other? I lean towards U.S. 90% coins myself, but I do like silver eagles too.

Everything and anything. That way you have access to all segments of the market when you take the profit. Plus there are some that I just like to hold.

I find myself taking an ASE or maybe a US Assay round to work with me and take it out and just look at it.. maybe a bit obsessed about it.

The other day I bought a brand new , never used jacket from Goodwill for $20. Very nice, but I had second thoughts before I paid for it.. never see $20 the same again..!

orange20
18th January 2009, 19:02
Thanks for help on ebay. The sellers said they bought them from the US mint.

I take my SAE with me too everywhere I go. I don't get that latte at Starbucks anymore, etc. I figure every dollar I save today is worth at least $15 tomorrow, probably more.
I just bought some materials on what Obama is fixing to do from a pretty knowledgeable guy, Lee Bellinger, and he thinks it will get bad, laws trying to make us all poor eventually.
A small window of opportunity is coming up, the last for a long time possibly, and all this info is good.

Ardent Listener
18th January 2009, 19:46
Thanks for help on ebay. The sellers said they bought them from the US mint.

I take my SAE with me too everywhere I go. I don't get that latte at Starbucks anymore, etc. I figure every dollar I save today is worth at least $15 tomorrow, probably more.
I just bought some materials on what Obama is fixing to do from a pretty knowledgeable guy, Lee Bellinger, and he thinks it will get bad, laws trying to make us all poor eventually.
A small window of opportunity is coming up, the last for a long time possibly, and all this info is good.

I like the idea of have a "pocket piece" of silver on you to remind you not to waste money. Silver is still very cheap when you consider how much more expensive everything else is getting. A jar of nuts is almost ten dollars and last I looked spot silver was about $11.00. I can get a silver eagle for $15 and pay "too much" for it. :)

Bullitt
26th January 2009, 00:06
I know its a dumb question but what is a round? Is it just a name for a coin

fredrock
26th January 2009, 00:29
I know its a dumb question but what is a round? Is it just a name for a coin

A generic term used by holders of PM's that typically refers to an ounce of silver bullion shaped like that of a coin. (Not a one ounce bar but a round)

Often the term is used of the silver coins minted by smaller or little known mints, while Maples, ASE, (American Silver Eagle) and Philly's, (Austrian Philharmonic) are used to identify the nationally minted stuff.

Fred

Bullitt
26th January 2009, 01:21
Thanks Fred. There has been a few abbreviations that I am unsure of here but a little time will enlighten me.

Yabezlas
27th January 2009, 07:50
I carry a couple, usually a 1987 ASE in an airtight, sometimes an 1879 naked (well worn) Morgan and a 1941 silver dime in a coin purse. I just like having them around. When I get to work I take out the ASE and place it on my desk. It helps to remind me why I am.....