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coctailer
12th April 2010, 19:05
Which ones are 40% silver?
I fail at Google

akak
12th April 2010, 19:32
Only those that are made from 40% silver!

I know that sounds like a smartass answer, but it isn't all that clear unless you really know what to look for.

All 40% silver Eisenhower dollars will have the "S" mintmark, but not ALL Eisenhower dollars with the "S" mintmark are silver ---most, in fact, are not. So you either need to know just what sort of packaging was used for the 40% silver ones, or else closely examine the edge of the coin(s) in question. The non-silver ones will show the obvious three-layer edge structure of a typical clad circulation coin, with an obvious copper core coated top and bottom with silvery cupro-nickel. The silver ones, though, will look more uniformly silver (like the 1965-1969 Kennedy halves) on the edge; although you will still see the three-part layered structure, it will not be nearly so obvious, and the middle will NOT look like either bright red or dark brown copper.

The best thing you could do would be to get ahold of one of the 40% silver Kennedy halves, and compare its edge to a contemporary quarter or half dollar from circulation --- the difference is fairly obvious when they are compared side-by-side.

coctailer
13th April 2010, 20:53
Oh,
I thought there was a date range where all Ikes were 40%.

Were 40% coins only made for proof sets?

akak
14th April 2010, 13:09
Oh,
I thought there was a date range where all Ikes were 40%.

Were 40% coins only made for proof sets?


No, the 40% silver ones were made each year that the coins were minted: 1971 through 1978.

And no, they were not just made for proof sets, but were made in uncirculated (non-proof) condition as well.
Althought, I am pretty sure that ALL uncirculated Eisenhower dollars with the "S" mintmark will be silver ---- otherwise, they would be proofs.

If you have a loose one, or a suspected one, the only real way to know if it is silver is to examine the edge.

digger
15th April 2010, 12:55
No, the 40% silver ones were made each year that the coins were minted: 1971 through 1978.

And no, they were not just made for proof sets, but were made in uncirculated (non-proof) condition as well.
Althought, I am pretty sure that ALL uncirculated Eisenhower dollars with the "S" mintmark will be silver ---- otherwise, they would be proofs.

If you have a loose one, or a suspected one, the only real way to know if it is silver is to examine the edge.

Acutally, the uncirculated silver Ike's were only produced in 1971, 72, 73, 74 & 76 (all with the 'S' mintmark).
The proof silver Ike's were only produced in those same years. NO silver Ike's in '77 and '78. (There are no Ike's dated 1975)

madduxxx
15th April 2010, 12:57
Some Eisenhower Dollars were minted in a 40% silver clad to be sold to collectors. All of these coins were minted at the San Francisco Mint, with dates 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, and 1976. There are also approximately 15-20 silver clad coins in the 1977 variety. These coins were either uncirculated or proof. Uncirculated coins came in cellophane with a blue plastic token in a blue envelope. Proof issues came in a proof set-like plastic case, contained in a brown "wood grain finish" slipcase box with a gold seal on the back. The uncirculated coins are referred to as 'Blue Ikes' and the proofs as 'Brown Ikes'. Coins minted in 1975 and 1976 for the Bicentennial come with the quarter and the half dollarHalf dollar of that brief series. The uncirculated coins were sold by the Mint for $3; the proof versions for $10. Two varieties of the Bicentennial dollar were produced in 1975 and can be distinguished by the thickness of the lettering on the reverse. The Type I has thicker lettering, shown in the picture above, while the Type II has more delicate lettering. The Type II version is more common.

Easiest way to tell the difference is to weigh them. (Amazon has small scales starting at 7 bucks). The copper nickel weighs in at ~22.7 grams while the silver clad weighs ~24.6 grams.

coctailer
16th April 2010, 22:02
So you either need to know just what sort of packaging was used for the 40% silver ones, or else closely examine the edge of the coin(s) in question. The non-silver ones will show the obvious three-layer edge structure of a typical clad circulation coin, with an obvious copper core coated top and bottom with silvery cupro-nickel. The silver ones, though, will look more uniformly silver (like the 1965-1969 Kennedy halves) on the edge; although you will still see the three-part layered structure, it will not be nearly so obvious, and the middle will NOT look like either bright red or dark brown copper.


Good description, but I'm not sure if I know what to look for. Is there a Google image you could post?

I was wondering because the lovely girls at my bank save Ikes when they come in for me to grab from them.

Is it a waste of time culling them for possible 40%ers?

There is no real reason I am collecting them from the bank, other than they remind me of when I was a kid.

They are also fun to use as poker chips when the crew comes over for poker.

akak
16th April 2010, 22:08
Good description, but I'm not sure if I know what to look for. Is there a Google image you could post?

I was wondering because the lovely girls at my bank save Ikes when they come in for me to grab from them.

Is it a waste of time culling them for possible 40%ers?

There is no real reason I am collecting them from the bank, other than they remind me of when I was a kid.

They are also fun to use as poker chips when the crew comes over for poker.



Coctailer, I can't find any images of the edges of 40% silver coins to show you.

Do you have any 40% silver (1965-1969) Kennedy half-dollars? If so, just compare the edge of one or two of them to the edge of any common circulation quarter --- the difference will be immediately obvious, although it is much harder to describe in words.

I used to cull 40% silver halves from bank rolls in the 1970s, and I NEVER needed to look at any of the dates --- just sliding all 20 coins from their rolls at one time, and examining the edges, was always sufficient to spot them. The edges of the 40%'ers, in most cases, look much more like the edges of solid 90% silver US coin than they resemble the edges of the current clad, silverless crap.

coctailer
16th April 2010, 22:34
I think I know what you are talking about now. On the edge they look almost like the pre-64 coins?
I remember when I was a kid, I didn't know what dates to look for on the 90% coins. I remember seeing some that LOOKED KINDA LIKE 90%ers, but I wasn't sure.

Was it only dollars anf halfs? or did they do it in quarters and dimes?

akak
16th April 2010, 22:41
I think I know what you are talking about now. On the edge they look almost like the pre-64 coins?
I remember when I was a kid, I didn't know what dates to look for on the 90% coins. I remember seeing some that LOOKED KINDA LIKE 90%ers, but I wasn't sure.

Was it only dollars anf halfs? or did they do it in quarters and dimes?


In circulation coins, they only made the 40% silver coins in half-dollars, and only dated 1965 through 1969. All the 40% silver dollars were made 1971 and after, when silver had been totally removed from circulation coinage, and so the 40% silver Eisenhower dollars were never made for circulation, although I suppose it is barely possible than a few got into circulation accidentally from uncirculated sets. 40% silver quarters, as far as I know, were only made for Bicentennial proof and uncirculated sets, dated 1976 (as were some half-dollars), and I don't believe any 40% silver dimes were ever made whatsoever.

What is Truth?
18th April 2010, 18:33
Coinflation.com Web


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1971-1974, 1976 Silver Eisenhower Dollar Value (United States)
U.S. MINT SPECIFICATIONS
Denomination: $1.00
Obverse Image: Dwight D. Eisenhower, 34th President of the United States.
Reverse Image: 1971-1974: Eagle flying over the moon holding an olive branch; tribute to the Apollo 11 mission.
1975-1976: Bicentennial design with the Liberty Bell in front of the moon (all were dated 1776-1976).
Metal Composition: 40% silver, 60% copper
Total Weight: 24.59 grams
Comments: All of the silver "Ike" coins were minted at the San Francisco Mint in 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, and 1976. These coins were either uncirculated or proof. Uncirculated coins came in cellophane with a blue plastic token in a blue envelope. Proof issues came in a proof set-like plastic case in a fancy brown wood colored box with a gold seal on back. The uncirculated coins are referred to as 'Blue Ikes' and the proofs as 'Brown Ikes'. Coins minted in 1975 and 1976 for the Bicentennial come with the quarter and the half dollar of that year. The uncirculated coins were sold by the Mint for three dollars; the proof version for ten dollars. Two varieties of the dollar were produced in 1976 and can be distinguished by the thickness of the lettering. [ ? ]

I'm begging you, read the preceding paragraph again. For the love of everything holy, read every word. If you typed "silver Eisenhower dollar value" in your search engine, you may end up here, but it does not mean your coin has any silver in it. Most Eisenhower dollars don't, especially if it's worn and circulated. Please visit the clad version of the Eisenhower Dollar page if you have a circulated, worn dollar.