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SilverTrees
26th June 2008, 19:01
Anybody know the best way to remove paint from those silver eagles with color graphics? I got a good deal on some today, but aint too fond of dale earnhardt or painted libertys, prefer to look at silver. any suggestions would be appreciated!
________
NEXIUM DEATH (http://www.classactionsettlements.org/lawsuit/nexium/)

Argentum
26th June 2008, 19:05
Sell them for a bit more than you bought, then buy what you like. You will just end up messing 'em up. Some folks like all that paint.

amadeus
26th June 2008, 20:07
Sell them for a bit more than you bought, then buy what you like. You will just end up messing 'em up. Some folks like all that paint.

What he said. You can probably get a premium.

goldminer
28th June 2008, 20:32
I've been told that acetone will take it off. Be sure to wash and thoroughly rinse with hot water.

Haven't tried this myself so would first try it on one coin.

hiyosilver
28th June 2008, 20:58
Acetone would probably do it, but be very careful with it. It has strong fumes and is extremely flammable. Perhaps pour a little in a small glass jar, just deep enough to cover one coin, and let it soak awhile. Put it in a safe place outside your home, but not in the sun. Check it after an hour or so, and if it hasn't lifted the paint by then, then I'd just leave the remaining coins alone, and sell them for the novelties they are. I don't recommend storing acetone anywhere around your home though.

argentos
28th June 2008, 21:25
I don't recommend storing acetone anywhere around your home though.

The ladies would disagree. What about their nail polish remover?

pkrebaum
28th June 2008, 21:26
3M makes a product called "safe strip" which is non-flammable and fairly non-toxic. Just let them soak for a few hours, then rub off with a towel. Avoid any strippers which have methylene chloride in them.

Or, you could just barter them for un-painted SAEs.... that way you avoid paying the spread. Perhaps your local coin dealer would be interested in a 1-for-1 trade ???

mountainmurph
28th June 2008, 22:23
Don't rub the coins with anything ,as you will be removing the mint luster also, just wash them off. Also, you might try olive oil.

SilverHawk
28th June 2008, 23:07
I use this silver polish from the jewelry section in WallyMart. I clean all my rounds this way. Paint gone in 3-5 seconds.

1. Dip coin up to 10 seconds
2. Then dip in water
3. Dry with cloth.

Repeat if necessary, but very few dirty coins need repeat.

Expect spot value when selling.

Anyone know how to get the (Thick) Laquer coating off coins?

hiyosilver
29th June 2008, 00:57
Anyone know how to get the (Thick) Laquer coating off coins?

Again, acetone is used to thin lacquers. But carefully prevent the breathing of fumes or exposure to skin.

Also, argentos, nail polish remover is a very diluted form of acetone, but still very toxic and dangerous. I don't recommend the use of it, because it is a proven carcinogen.

YakHairSandwich
29th June 2008, 03:06
Acetone will dissolve the paint without harming the metal.

It may even make them shinier!

argentos
29th June 2008, 04:05
Again, acetone is used to thin lacquers. But carefully prevent the breathing of fumes or exposure to skin.

Also, argentos, nail polish remover is a very diluted form of acetone, but still very toxic and dangerous. I don't recommend the use of it, because it is a proven carcinogen.

You're right hiyosilver. I hadn't realised how just dangerous it is. I've had a google and although there is no mention of carcinogenicity, the list of known risks is very long, including the possibility of death.

Potential Health Effects of Acetone

Eye:
Produces irritation, characterized by a burning sensation, redness, tearing, inflammation, and possible corneal injury. Vapours cause eye
irritation.

Skin:
May be absorbed through the skin. Repeated or prolonged exposure maycause drying and cracking of the skin.

Ingestion:
May cause irritation of the digestive tract. May cause central nervous system depression, characterized by excitement, followed by
headache, dizziness, drowsiness, and nausea. Advanced stages may cause collapse, unconsciousness, coma and possible death due to
respiratory failure. Aspiration of material into the lungs may cause chemical pneumonitis, which may be fatal.

Inhalation:
Inhalation of high concentrations may cause central nervous system effects characterized by nausea, headache, dizziness, unconsciousness and coma. Causes respiratory tract irritation. May cause motor incoordination and speech abnormalities.

Chronic:
Prolonged or repeated skin contact may cause dermatitis. Chronic inhalation may cause effects similar to those of acute inhalation.

clr8ter
29th June 2008, 09:26
Seems like acetone's effects can be controlled with good ventilation and a pair of gloves. We use Acetone, Denatured Alcohol, & Laquer Thinner at work on a regular basis with no problems. Long term health effects......? But for a once in a while contact, I wouldn't worry. Gasoline is also not good for you, but we come into contact with it regularly......

JesterJay
29th June 2008, 13:17
Keep It Simple Stupid,
That's what works for me. So I agree with Argentum.
Sell them (for possibly a premium) then buy the stuff you really like.
JesterJay



Sell them for a bit more than you bought, then buy what you like. You will just end up messing 'em up. Some folks like all that paint.

SilverHawk
29th June 2008, 13:37
Thanks for info, HiYoSilver!